1940 Primus 394

Discussion in '394' started by Carlsson, Oct 14, 2010.

  1. Carlsson

    Carlsson Sweden Admin/Founder Member

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    This lamp is from 1940 (marked AE 30), and has the /6 option which is the 2/3rd frosted globe.
    As the number 3 in 394 suggests, this is an alcohol fueled lamp and I believe that this was the first year it was made, which not is so strange since I think that the fossile fuel rationing started that year.

    1287072992-394_1.jpg


    1287072992-394_1.jpg 1287072997-394_2.jpg 1287073005-394_burner.jpg 1287073010-394_tank.jpg

    This lamp and it's paraffin fueled counterpart 994 has a larger sibling, 1024, seen here
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 20, 2017
  2. Nils Stephenson

    Nils Stephenson Founder Member

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    Nice lamp Christer. Is it still set up for alcohol?

    I havn't seen any evidence for when these alcohol models started, but have seen a few 1320s from 1938. That is the only alcohol model I have seen from the 30s though.
     
  3. Carlsson

    Carlsson Sweden Admin/Founder Member

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    Actually it still is set up for alcohol. It has a large jet (without any parts number- just Primus, Sweden on it), and a restrictor made out of brass at the bottom of the air intake.
     
  4. Nils Stephenson

    Nils Stephenson Founder Member

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    I notice that the number plate is in brass. This seems to happen occasionally. I have a 1321 where the nickel on this plate started coming off when I cleaned it. the nickel on the rest is perfect. They must have used a strange quality of brass for this plate.
     
  5. Carlsson

    Carlsson Sweden Admin/Founder Member

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    I have never reflected over the fact that the number plated could have been nickel plated originally!
    I know that they usually are on the lanterns, but I just figured they came both ways.
    It make sense that it is on a table lamp that the nickel might have disappeared, because they would of course have been polished now and then.
    A lantern would normally just have been wiped off when absolutely necessary.
     

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