1945 Aug 220C

Discussion in 'L220, 220, 228, B to K Variants' started by rbhodges, Nov 18, 2012.

  1. rbhodges

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    Here is a fine example of a 220C made in Aug. of 1945. This lantern is in as found condition with only a light dusting and tying on new pair of mantles being required. It came to me in its original box with its paper work and wrenches. The burner on this lantern has a number steel parts, as expected given the shortage of copper for making brass. I expected some of the steel parts, but was kind of surprised to that the roto mechanism and the gen nut were made of steel. The gas tip cleaner body is brass.
    The mixing chamber is the familiar brass casting however the down tubes appear to be steel. I think I recall seeing some these post war modals with pressed (presumably from steel) mixing chambers. I find it interesting that Coleman opted to place a very mil-specish caution decal on the tank. Was this to give the the lantern a familiar look to GI s returning home? Enjoy the pics

    Rick

    1353261199-IMG_2213.jpg 1353261211-IMG_2214.jpg 1353261225-IMG_2216.jpg 1353261241-IMG_2219.jpg 1353261257-IMG_2221.jpg
     
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  2. Mackburner

    Mackburner United Kingdom Founder Member Subscriber

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    As far as I know these were never civilian models. The US forces may have had huge numbers of Milspec lanterns to play with but they also continued to buy the more standard models right through WW2 and 220/228C were also sold in quantity to the USQM. In Aug '45 Coleman would have been filling a QM order not making lamps for civillian sales. ::Neil::
     
  3. ulysses

    ulysses Subscriber

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    Rick:

    The nicest 220C I've seen. I really like them. I've got a '44 with the Aladdin conversion awaiting restoration. I think I've seen the yellow lable on '46 and '47 models, and perhapseven later. I suspect Coleman was using up the stock.

    Neil:

    I've suspected that the US Government was buying "civilian" type 220s and 228s, and perhaps 242s throughout the war. Are they marked "US" or in other ways to indicate thay are government property? Given that a large part of rural America did not have electricity until after the war, I think that there might have been production for a civilian market during the war years.

    Paul
     
  4. rbhodges

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    Here are some more photos of the box that this lantern came in. It would seem to be a civilian sale. What is interesting to me is what was printed inside the box. It looks as though a box ment for a gov. delivery was turn inside out and reprinted for civilian dilivery. Photos were taken on my Ipod so I'm sory about the Quality.

    Rick 1353371969-220_opt.jpg 1353371985-2201_opt.jpg 1353371997-2202_opt.jpg 1353372011-2203_opt.jpg
     
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  5. Dan D

    Dan D Subscriber

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    A little bit of information here on Coleman war time production.

    Also, the best $10.00 you've ever spent on Coleman is to get Jerry's CD. It covers the entire war era and more. Hours and hours of fascinating reading. I bought mine at this year's ICCC convention.

    From an ad in The Coleman Light...
    "For Sale: The Coleman News on
    DVD. A valuable piece of Coleman
    history. Enjoy this 400 page journey
    back to that great Coleman era.
    Sixteen years (1936-1951) of factory
    news in pdf format. Cannot be altered
    or printed from the disc. $10 to US
    and Canada, slight additional mailing
    costs elsewhere. Send money order
    to Jerry Engbring, 4809 Rothman Pl.,
    Monoma, WI 53716."


    Dan
     
  6. Mackburner

    Mackburner United Kingdom Founder Member Subscriber

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    During WW2 Coleman advertised several times that their lamps were "For them today for you tommorow" in effect they were saying we are making lamps for our brave GIs and you can't have one until the job is done. In fact there are virtually no US made pressure lamps sold as civillian models from 1943 to 1945. Sears catalogues list a range of products that were not available from Spring 1943 to Spring 1945. The last they offered in the fall 1942 issue were AGM models 3006 and 3026. The the next lamp offered for sale is Spring 1946 with Coleman 242C and 228C. In fact looking at that page it appears I was wrong and some 220/228C types were being sold in 1946 as civilian models.

    Here is the notice that Sears included in their catalogues during this period.

    1353424983-Sears_1944_Fall_not_for_sale_notice.jpg


    US Marked civillian stuff is rare but I have seen a few. Akron AGM and Coleman supplied the USQM through the 1930s and 40s with quite a range of models. The Millspec was designed for front line type of use but the rest of the range was used in base situations such as command centres and the like. ::Neil::
     
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  7. rbhodges

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    This has turned out to be one of the more interesting lanterns I have posted. I was of the thought that the 220C was a post war product. I have all of the paper work that came in the carton. I'll be taking it to work tomorow to have it digitized so I can add it to this post. It all looks very civilionish, including the slip of paper that almost seems to appoligise for the use of substitude materials due to the lack of tin nickle act.. I'll add this to this post as soon as I can.

    Rick
     
  8. Mackburner

    Mackburner United Kingdom Founder Member Subscriber

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    Well August 1945 is Post War if only just. I suspect there was some over production issues here. Coleman probably kept the line running in anticipation of QM orders and ended up with stock and no customer so did a paperwork/packaging change and flogged them off to the public. This must be just about the first lamp available to the pubic for three years. ::Neil::
     
  9. rbhodges

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    1354155755-20121126122155526.jpg
     
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  10. rbhodges

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    Here is the rest of the paper work that came with lantern. http://0flo.com/index.php?posts/23331
     
  11. ulysses

    ulysses Subscriber

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    Rick, Neil:

    An anecdotal story about the use of lanterns during WWII. My father was a Major with XX Corps, Third Army. During late '44 to early '45, XX Corps HQ was in Thionville, initially reducing the fortress of Metz, and later holding the line while Patton's other two corps attacked into the southern shoulder of the Bulge. He told me he had two Coleman lanterns, one to provide light for his staff work, and another to put under the field table, with a GI blanket draped over it to keep him warm in the unheated building. He draped the blanket over his legs to stay warm enough to keep working.
     

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