1970 Tilley AL9A

Discussion in 'AL9-AL9A' started by Mackburner, Apr 30, 2013.

  1. Mackburner

    Mackburner United Kingdom Founder Member Subscriber

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    Here is one I found this weekend. It appears to have been repainted in red over the original Tilley Gold. The lamp is dated May 1970 which is pretty late for these track lamps. It is missing its heat deflector and the control knob is lost but otherwise is in good original condition. I have a suspicion I have another of these lurking in the shed somewhere and I bought this with trade in mind but I have to dig the other one out first to see if it is indeed the same ::Neil::

    1367281177-Til_AL9A_5-70-as_found_01.jpg

    1367281232-Til_AL9A_5-70-as_found_02.jpg 1367281247-Til_AL9A_5-70-as_found_04.jpg 1367281264-Til_AL9A_5-70-as_found_05.jpg
     
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  2. James

    James Subscriber

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    Hi Neil did you find that in St Albans?
     
  3. Rangie

    Rangie Subscriber

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    Plastic handle and no through bolt, Conversion hood, a few little changes at the end of its production eh!

    The example I have is a fairly old beastie to compare with though.

    Alec.
     
  4. Mackburner

    Mackburner United Kingdom Founder Member Subscriber

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    The handle is steel welded on with a rubber sleeve.

    I found a few stoves and this 'ere all in the same place but I am not sure I want to share my sources. Mind you we do travel a fair bit sometimes. There are a few places we go to regularly which involve a 200 mile or more round trip. Only get lucky for lamps sometimes but we do often find bits of silver or Satsuma to please my lady. ::Neil::
     
  5. David Shouksmith

    David Shouksmith United Kingdom Founder Member

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    :shock: Seems a long way to travel for a few tangerines - I just go to my local fruit shop... :p
     
  6. Claus C

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    Hi Neil

    What a nice and funny find. GZ. :thumbup: Was the purpose to carry the lamps by the holder and place them beside railway-tracks. :?:
    I've never seen them before, but I like O:)

    Claus C
     
  7. David Shouksmith

    David Shouksmith United Kingdom Founder Member

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    Yeah, because of the wider base, the lamp could be placed on the ballast between and by the side of the railway sleepers without toppling over.

    What's "GZ" by the way :?:
     
  8. Claus C

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    Thanks David for historic insight.
    GZ is a shortening for "congratulations" and before you get going I must inform you that I have learned it from brites after seeing it written so many times that I had to ask.
    It was one of the most common shortenings on another thread I am taking part of like WTF, BRB, Cya and NP. :lol:

    Claus C
     
  9. David Shouksmith

    David Shouksmith United Kingdom Founder Member

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    I don't think GZ is British, Claus - I've not seen it before, which is why I asked. I don't know what NP is, either...

    I try not to use abbreviations, particularly on an international forum, because they tend to assume the other chap knows what I'm on about.

    WTF seems pretty universal though... ;) :lol:
     
  10. Claus C

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    OK

    Claus C
     
  11. Gneiss

    Gneiss Subscriber

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    Other than "Ground Zero" with reference to a GPS position...
     
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  12. Claus C

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    WTF, BRB, Cya and NP. :lol:

    Ok here is the birth of GZ and a translation to all the others.

    GZ comes from Gratz which comes from gratulations which comes from congratualtions. It is very english though I dont know if it is brittish - I just learned it my self from a brite on a british thread.

    NP - No problem.
    Cya - See you.
    BRB - be right back.
    LOL - laughing out loud.
    Wtf - Wtf.
    OK - zero killed. And for me first time from CPL:
    SWMBO - she who must be obayed (introduced to me by Neil)

    I agree with you David a long part of the way not to use shortenings and I think it is the first time I used a shortening my self in lack of time.
    But when used, I consider it as a chance to learn something funny and I think thats the way OK made it to the most known shortening in the world.

    So just keep them coming just not in flocks and I will Roflmao - roll on floor laughing my ass of O:)

    Claus C
     
  13. David Shouksmith

    David Shouksmith United Kingdom Founder Member

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    :-s :? Zero killed? That has no meaning I'm aware of...

    Another one commonly seen on CCS/CPL:-
    IIRC - If I recall/remember correctly

    I sometimes use:-
    TTBOMKAB - To the best of my knowledge and belief;
    ROTFLMFAO - even more so than ROTFLMAO ;)
     
  14. Claus C

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    :D David - so you had them up your sleeves anyway.

    OK means Nobody is dead. When the english scottish irish clans went to war against each others and the anxious womens stay home and prepare flowers for funerals, bandages and perhaps the, while waiting in excitement to see how many got killed by claymores, spears, arrows and daggers then the returning horde of figthers carried a sign with them where the number of dead was shown to show the waiting flock at distance.
    OK - ment 0 killed - and that was a good sign to see. And the mead was already opened when they arrived to the willage.
    So everytime the things was in order after this - it was OK.
    We can see BBC in Danmark - but the mead was my idea. Just let me know if I am to teach you about more history from your island. O:)

    Claus C
     
  15. Claus C

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    Ok - in all the excitement I mixed Braveheart up with the american civil war - sorry ](*,) This is my translation direct from wikipedia:

    "Okay" s origin is that it was first used by the American Civil War. When people looked at the different houses of the deceased, was written the number on the front door. When they did not find any bodies they wrote OK as an abbreviation for "zero killed".

    Still saw it first time on BBC though.

    But im sure you forgive me. :content:

    Claus C
     
  16. David Shouksmith

    David Shouksmith United Kingdom Founder Member

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    Ah, right - so you got your information about English history from Walt Disney... :lol:

    Several theories here from a respectable source - none of which are anything to do with the Braveheart bollocks or the US Civil War...
     
  17. David

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    there a little confusion here and a little thought an I think you'll find that Claus is mixing 0k with ok,
    where 0k can mean what Claus is stating as "zero killed" and OK is a easy misinterpretation
     
  18. David Shouksmith

    David Shouksmith United Kingdom Founder Member

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    ...which all goes towards proving my point that abbreviations should, as far as possible, be avoided here. :thumbup:

    One seen here that bemuses me is the use of w/ for 'with' which saves all of two keypresses. Are people really that lazy or is their life expectancy measured in seconds? :whistle:

    Similarly the use of 'prolly' for 'probably' - another two keypresses and one second of lifetime saved... :roll: ](*,) :)
     
  19. Rangie

    Rangie Subscriber

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    So, yes, the AL9A is nice..... :roll:

    Alec.
     
  20. David

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    yeah Alec, your right very nice much less bashed than mine ;)
     
  21. JEFF JOHNSON

    JEFF JOHNSON United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Good find! :thumbup:
     

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