Amita Iron. Tilley clon?

Discussion in 'Other Brands' started by Juan, Jan 28, 2011.

  1. Juan

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    This is very strange: I could never find in Argentina any British product but I found today this iron which was made in Argentina. Never used. I expect this manufacturer would made some other product.

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    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 1, 2017
  2. David Shouksmith

    David Shouksmith United Kingdom Founder Member

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    There are some differences in the details, but that's very much like the Tilley DN250...
     
  3. Juan

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    To me, the really interesting thing is to have a Tilley look alike product made locally. I don't know why but, being the railways built or operated mainly by British companies until the 40's, it is surprising not to find British lamps, just some wick inspector lanterns and some burners to make locally the lamps, but pressure devices are or local made or German and, less common, Swedish. I could see this week the first Tilley X246 on internet and now this, which is very rare.
     
  4. Mackburner

    Mackburner United Kingdom Founder Member Subscriber

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    A Tilley iron copy is pehaps odd out there but I am not aware that the German companies ever made an iron so if there was a demand then it would have to be either American or English. I am not an expert on irons generally but I think Tilley were perhaps the last company to drop the iron in the early 1980s. I think the Coleman iron died in the 1950s. So a rural demand in the 1960s and later would have to be met with Tilley. Be interesting to see this one dismantled to compare parts with a real Tilley. ::Neil::
     
  5. Juan

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    Perhaps there was a higher demand for irons than lanterns, but there were a lot of local made especially Volcán. I'll post a pic of a volcán.
     
  6. Juan

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    Here there is a link to a Volcán iron.
    I was thinking at your comment and it is most probably right: Amita, the brand name, is a sort of diminutive for "ama de casa", i guess in English language something like housekeeper or hosewife, so a product oriented to a specific market.
     
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