Bike brake cable

Discussion in 'Fettling Forum' started by TerryColeman, Dec 4, 2021.

  1. TerryColeman

    TerryColeman United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Hi there, just a quick request for info because I need to decarbon the vapouriser and the hood tubes on my Guardsman.

    I hear/see that a bike (bicycle?) brake cable can be used with the end flared?

    What is this item and where do i get it and how do I use it?

    Is there a specific diameter needed?

    Any info welcomed.

    Many thanks, Terry
     
  2. BigStevie

    BigStevie United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Hi Terry,

    Using a frayed bike brake cable sounds a bit harsh to me for cleaning the burner tubes. A brass cylindrical brush, like a small bottle brush, should cope with any buildup of carbon. Try to avoid scratching the brass.

    Don’t be tempted to dismantle the burner unless absolutely necessary, unscrewing the tubes can reveal damaged threads that may not re-seal properly when you try to reassemble.

    As for the vapouriser, don’t be tempted to try and force anything through it, the hole at the top can be easily damaged (enlarged) turning it into scrap. The safest way is to heat and quench and then tap along the length of the vapouriser, you should be able to loosen carbon this way.

    Whatever you’re doing with the vapouriser, take care of the Cleaning wire, don’t force it back into the vapouriser tube. Hold the vapouriser upside down and gently drop the wire in, giving it a gentle tap on the side of the tube to get it to fall in place.

    I’m sure others will have their own ideas and ways of doing things. Main thing is not to damage anything!
     
  3. ColinG

    ColinG United Kingdom Subscriber

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  4. Henry Plews

    Henry Plews Subscriber

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    The hood tubes are air intakes so there will be no carbon in them, any dust / dirt can be cleaned out with an 8mm tube brush, here is one example
    Brass Cylinder Wire Brush 8mm - Wire Brushes from www.Tube-Brush.co.uk
    Or just use a twist of steel wool. Removing the tubes from the burner is NOT recommended.

    Decarboning Tilley vapourisers; a piece of cable, be it for bicycle brakes or anything else, will only be of use if you separate the fitting from the tube. Not too difficult if the fitting is brass because it will unscrew, though care and lubrication is recommended. Though not impossible, it's a bit more complicated with the crimped-in steel fittings and reassembly requires silver solder so unless you already have a good supply, it's doubtful the procedure will be economically viable.
     
  5. TerryColeman

    TerryColeman United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Thank you all for the info. I will go real careful!!!! Terry
     
  6. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom Subscriber

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    At intervals throughout the length of the vapouriser there are pricker wire guide discs (diameter that of the vapouriser, central hole a lttle larger diameter than that of the pricker wire). A brake cable won’t dislodge them but it stands no chance of getting past them to dislodge deposits. The discs also act as traps for debris dislodged by ‘heat and quench’. When dry from that process several blasts of compressed air could get rid of much of it.

    2792B028-E43F-4E5C-AC96-389718DE609F.jpeg

    C4A1A007-AD78-4D6C-B882-6F74CCC7B489.jpeg
     
  7. James K

    James K United Kingdom Subscriber

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    The bycicle gear cable trick is for European lamps with a Preston loop type generator.
    For a Tilley burner if you can get the mixing dome off the top it's worth cleaning the inside of the steel mixing tube and cleaning the inside of the dome. Remove any carbon any which way you can. If you can't get the dome off and have to give it some sort of wash be sure to dry it or the mixing tube will go rusty, just give it a pre heat as if you were lighting it.
    For the generators I find they are either blocked or worn. For blocked I use a propane torch? Not on the bottom 2 inches but esp on the top that goes inside the burner. Get it nice and pink until smoke and fire stop coming out from the end. Lots of tapping the bottom on a piece of wood should help soot to escape.
    If it was only blocked you are good to go, if it had blocked itself because it had a worn jet the burner will glow red after a few mins running, this for me is time for a new one.
    Recently I was maintaining the fleet of workshop lamps and ran out of old ones to revive and observed these events.
    Pic should show a Tilley burner still glowing red after running with a worn generator.
    20211022_180743.jpg

    Hope my ramblings are of use to you or anyone else.
     
  8. ROGER BAKER

    ROGER BAKER Subscriber

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    Hello all. I got into the habit one might say, of saving evidently clogged vaporisers for the winter and sticking a bunch of them wired together in the red embers of my log-burner for a good few minutes and letting them cool naturally. To shake the soot out I have an orbital sander with a round shortbread tin cable tied to the bed. Inside this stands a tennis ball tin which is a slightly loose fit, but acts to compound the percussive shockwaves developed inside, and nothing has jumped ashore yet!. I fasten this sander into the vice and do the "shake 'n smack" for a few more minutes whilst I get on with something else. They do come out with crud at the bottom inside the threaded area from bouncing around in the soot in the bottom of the can, but it's easier to get at. The more you put inside the greater the agitation they develop. I usually paint dots on them to keep track of which is which. Sounds a bit of a dull way to spend an afternoon, but it does bring rewards in most cases. Hope this might prove useful to others. I do have some pics somewhere in my archives if anyone needs further encouragement. PS. A BBQ does just as good a job as the log burner in summer conditions, but don't stick them on under your sausages.
     

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