Blanchard 1215 about 1912?

Discussion in 'Blanchard & Barnard' started by Mackburner, Dec 2, 2015.

  1. Mackburner

    Mackburner United Kingdom Founder Member Subscriber

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    I acquired the tank for this a few months ago and have just found a couple of burners to fit it. I have not seen another tank of this shape before so I think it is possibly very early for Blanchard. There were several very minor stress cracks around the central seam and a serious leak at the top tank boss so I have had to insert a POR15 liner to get it to hold pressure. I am not sure of the model number but since it is of a size to accept burners with the large reflectors I assume it is a 1215. ::Neil::

    1449027367-Blanchard_1215-old_style_01.jpg

    1449027385-Blanchard_1215-old_style_02.jpg 1449027402-Blanchard_1215-old_style_03.jpg 1449027420-Blanchard_1215-old_style_04.jpg 1449027438-Blanchard_1215-old_style_05.jpg 1449027460-Blanchard_1215-old_style_07.jpg
     
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  2. Michel

    Michel Subscriber

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    Gorgeous!
    I think I'll never have any opportunity to find such a lamp here in France but I love it
     
  3. Claus C

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    Wauw a nice one Neil, and fettled up to working condition too. :thumbup: :thumbup:

    What is the purpose of this lamp, is it hanging or standing or even both? Is it made for something special?

    Claus C
     
  4. karli

    karli Subscriber

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    Gratulation

    :thumbup: :thumbup: :thumbup: :thumbup: :thumbup:

    My Blanchard is still waiting for this moment
     
  5. Mackburner

    Mackburner United Kingdom Founder Member Subscriber

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    These are always hanging lamps. When standing the globes are too close to the table and would probably scorch the surface. Their primary use was as stallholder lamps in London Markets.

    They are tricky burners to fettle but easy enough once you get to know them. It is a clever piece of design and whilst complex they do seem to always fettle well and no matter how old still perform well.

    The biggest problem is always the prickers. To access the pricker carrier rack you remove the top plug on the burner and rotate the pinion to lift the rack out of the burner. The needle is held in the rack which looks like this.

    1449064390-Blanchard_needle_dimensions.jpg

    I make new needles by grinding down a 27mm long piece of an old Tilley pricker to create a 0.006" needle end about 1.5mm long. Tilley pricker wire is the right size to fit the rack. It takes me about 20 minutes to grind a new end and I reckon to break maybe one in four. I grind the ends with the wire in a Dremel running at about 12,000rpm and after taking the wire down to about 0.020" then grind to 0.006" with an oil stone and use a illuminated magnifier to see what I am doing. When fetting an old Blanchard burner you have to remove and clean the jet. This requires a box spanner to reach into the burner. The jets are steel and after a long period of storage tend to rust slightly. This surface rust needs to be ground off by gently rubbing on an oil stone. There is a triangular block inside the jet which is a guide for the pricker rack. This needs to be cleaned of old carbon residue.

    1449065079-Blanchard_needle_and_jet_assembly.jpg

    ::Neil::
     
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  6. longilily

    longilily United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Didn't realise you were so dexterous Neil ! ;)

    Cool 8)
     
  7. Jim Currie

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    Hi Neil,
    This is a nice find Neil, and indeed an early Blanchard 1215 tank and arms, and I think it would date from about 1915 on wards.
    In the George Adams 1914 price list, it shows one early twin Blanchard Model 1255 with 2 x 100cp burners and very ornate arms and small tank.

    The style of this tank and arms would suggest this was made later than 1914 and is the forerunner of the later standard tank on Blanchard 1215s, this early style of curved arm also changed to the straight type by about 1918-20.

    By about 1915 Blanchard had stopped putting Model numbers on it's tanks, as the same tank could be used with any number of configurations of burner sizes, arm, reflectors, globes and trims for indoors and out door use, all which were given different model numbers.

    Jim
     
  8. Carlsson

    Carlsson Sweden Admin/Founder Member

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    A while ago at CCS, I suggested that this could be the same lamp model they used in Endurance during Shackelton's expedition, but never got any response there.
    What do you people here say?
    The CCS topic is here, but a direct link to the pictures of interest is here.
    In the seventh picture there is a similar lamp.
    It's hard to tell from that angle, but it looks like the arms are curved.
     
  9. pete sav

    pete sav Founder Member

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    Another picture here christer different angle looks much the same style arms

    1449086774-Shackleton-crew-inside-Endu_1_.jpg

    pete
     
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  10. Claus C

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    It really looks like the same type of lamp. The pictured lamp has got rounded upper-hoods on top.
    The crew seems to be in a jolly mood :D

    Claus C
     
  11. pete sav

    pete sav Founder Member

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    Hi Neil
    the tank base looks as domed as the top is it?
    and the swage around the mid section above the gauge is there a solder joint here?
    looks like the tanks made of 2 halves soldered mid section and the base "bell bit" soldered on for it to stand on,unless the joint is on the bottom bit cannot tell so well from the pictures.
    that metal in the centre bottom will be a tube for the fuel pickup but it also holds and strengthens the tank its similar setup to the hanging lamps
    nice lamp neil
    cheers pete
     
  12. Mick Emm

    Mick Emm Founder Member

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    Hi !
    Another Blanchard with differing features to wonder over .
    The tank Neil has looks a very plain utilitarian lamp looking a lot like it would fit into the Blanchard time scale about 1930 !

    The shackleton boat book I have seen shows two Blanchard glasses to start with and later only one glass , so who forgot to take a spare glass or two !!

    mick
     
  13. JEFF JOHNSON

    JEFF JOHNSON United Kingdom Subscriber

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    An excellent find and well fettled Neil! :thumbup: :thumbup:
     
  14. Jim Currie

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    Neil,
    As the above photo from Shackelton's Expedition of 1915 shows a Blanchard 1215, with the standard tank that was used on all of Blanchard's twin lamps up to 1925, and afterwards by W.M Still.
    That would suggest your tank was either made earlier, pre 1915, or was may-be one made later if there was a shortages of normal tanks, may be during the 1914-18 war years, (that's only a thought of coause Neil)
    Is there a serial number on the Arm?

    Jim
     
  15. Mackburner

    Mackburner United Kingdom Founder Member Subscriber

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    The tank is made in two domed halves and soldered together with an extra skirt as a stand. It has a central tube running from the top to the base with a couple of holes near the bottom. The fuel feed is attached to the arm fitting and fits inside this tube.

    I assumed this was an early tank rather than a later type simply because it is a shape I have not seen before and in general the later a product the more survivors. The number on the arm is 53. I am not familiar with these serial numbers but maybe 53 is from around 1909-1910? Also there is no address on the shield which also perhaps indicates early. ::Neil::
     
  16. James

    James Subscriber

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    Fine looking amp. I wonder if the tank was made like this before the company made the tooling to press the "bell" as a single piece as I would imagine it was easier to make the two halves.

    Did Blanchard ever make two identical lamps :D
     
  17. pete sav

    pete sav Founder Member

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    Neil as I understand it the number 53 on the lamp means there was at least 52 others like this made so not really a prototype run,
    More likely they made them like this until stills had the spinning gear to run up the bell tanks as they would be easier to produce and assemble less work and soldered joins.
    So your one must predate the one in the picture in 1915.
    Now this one in the gallery
    http://0flo.com/index.php?threads/2164
    has the bell tank and the sweeping arms but it has square blocks for the main control valves which as far as I know from dated lamps\burners about 1922, yours has the round ball and and sockets as all the earlier lamps have which I believe are all pre mid 1917
    There is a intermediate type just a round ball between the two types all the dates could be give or take a bit as I can only go by what I have here

    1449179824-IMG_1917.JPG 1449179843-IMG_mid_1917_on.JPG 1449179860-IMG_1922_on.JPG

    hope you can see the differences from these like
    its a good lamp neil one I would be glad to own myself still no closer dating it but nice early Blanchard
    cheers pete
     
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  18. David Shouksmith

    David Shouksmith United Kingdom Founder Member

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    Assuming they started at number 1, of course - which most manufacturers don't. Mind, I don't know about Wm. Still, specifically.

    I wish I had a Blanchard, any Blanchard... :cry:
     
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  19. Mackburner

    Mackburner United Kingdom Founder Member Subscriber

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    The burner units on this one were taken off a later W M Still Bell shaped tank. I have two of the bell tanks here without burner units. So 4 tanks and 2 complete lamps. All 4 tanks are different and I assume are evidence of continuous evolution.

    This tank was not made by W M Still. They took over Blanchard manufacture I think about 1922-1923 ish. Hard to date the changes but in 1909 and 1913 The company was The Gas Economising and Improved Light Syndicate. In 1919 and 1922 it was Blanchard Lamps (British)Ltd. By 1929 and through the 1930s they were advertised as W M Still Ltd. Somewhere in there if I remember right Walter Barnard began making the lamps from around the early 1920S. Jim probably knows this history better than I do. ::Neil::
     
  20. pete sav

    pete sav Founder Member

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    don't think your right here check this page out
    http://www.gracesguide.co.uk/W._M._Still_and_Sons
    I reckon stills was involed with blanchards long before they took over the lamp company
    spinning the tanks up
     
  21. Mackburner

    Mackburner United Kingdom Founder Member Subscriber

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    That does not mention Blanchard at all. Still product is marked as such and this lamp is not. We have just about established this one was made around 1914 - 1918 and we know what the company names were in that period.

    From the London telephone directory and various adverts:- From 1907 to 1911 Blanchard Oil Light 138 Leadenhall Street. From 1911 to 1913 Blanchard Incandescent Oil Lamps 151 Farringdon Road. From 1914 to 1925 Blanchard Lamps (British) Ltd 151 Farringdon Road. Still may well have made some of the parts but the company who sold the lamp was Blanchard not Still. ::Neil::
     
  22. pete sav

    pete sav Founder Member

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    I am fully aware of all the dates and addresses for the various companies Neil and have never said this lamp was not put out by Blanchard at all

    What I did say was
    and finally
    at the end of the same post

    I did imply stills was making the tanks for Blanchard never said he was marketing the lamp under his name as he did not have the company till 1925 as you keep harping on about
     
  23. Mackburner

    Mackburner United Kingdom Founder Member Subscriber

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    OK point taken and I am sorry if you think I was labouring the point but my problem was the implication seemed to me to be that Still were making them and if I was confused then so might others be. One other problem I have is that I don't recall seeing any evidence that Still did spin the tanks for Blanchard. I suspect they may well have done though because it was their area of expertise but I don't remember the evidence for that. Maybe I missed it. Happens because I don't remember everything. ::Neil::
     

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