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Blanchard 1397

Discussion in 'Fettling Forum' started by Henry Plews, Jul 29, 2017.

  1. Henry Plews United Kingdom

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    Some of you may remember seeing this on eBay about a month ago.

    Blanchard 1397 01.jpg


    I peeled off the lead cowpat where the pressure gauge should be with my thumbnail to reveal this
    IMG_0472C.JPG
    So that I could easily fit a Blanchard pressure gauge if ever one came my way, I drilled and tapped the hole to take a 0.25 inch B.S.B. thread with the intention of inserting a blanking plug.
    IMG_0484.JPG
    Loco Stu came to my rescue a supplied a gauge
    IMG_0509.JPG :thumbup::thumbup::thumbup:

    Unable to get a good seal with the original cork gasket on the filler cap and NRV cork pip, I replaced them with rubber - Tilley seals are a perfect fit !
    Unfortunately, the spring in the NRV is very weak and inspite of the new seal, there was still a slow loss of pressure. The air stem is also badly worn and wouldn't seal properly either.
    IMG_0505.JPG
    The addition of a 1.75 mm thick rubber washer and a little PTFE tape cured that.
    IMG_0500.JPG
    Yet another dunk test revealed a small leak around the central boss in the tank top. Not having the confidence to remove the top and re-solder from the inside as per original construction, I ran some solder around the outside.
    IMG_0501B.JPG
    Amateurish and untidy but it works and is mostly hidden by the handle.

    Other work included washing out the tank, cleaning the filters and burner, making a new cleaning needle and installing a new gland packing made from a strip of graphite sheet after cleaning and polishing the rust off the valve stem.

    With top cowl borrowed from another Blanchard
    With top cowl.JPG

    And without cowl.
    Without top cowl..JPG
     
  2. Hanzo United States

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    Great work on a great prize.
     
  3. JEFF JOHNSON

    JEFF JOHNSON United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Well saved and it's a grand old lamp once again!:thumbup::D/:clap::D/:clap::thumbup:
     
  4. Tony Press

    Tony Press Australia Subscriber

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    Excellent revival, Henry. :thumbup:

    Cheers

    Tony
     
  5. WimVe

    WimVe Netherlands Subscriber

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    Nice restoration !
     
  6. Henry Plews United Kingdom

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    Thank you for the compliments.
    Most of what I did wasn't too complicated, just time consuming with many dunk tests along the way.
    As I mentioned in my original post, if I'd had the confidence (and skill), I would have un-soldered the top and taken it out, not just to re-solder the central boss but also to re-orientate the top. If you look at similar lamps in the Reference gallery, you'll see that on this example, the filler cap and pressure gauge are transposed, i.e. the filler is at the back.

    Some of you may also have noticed that the wooden hand grip is towards the rear end rather than being up against the hanging loop, this makes the lamp very unbalanced. Unfortunately it's seized in that position and refuses to move and I've already managed to chip away some of the wood in my efforts to shift it. Not really the sort of lamp to be carried around, the handle is mainly to assist in raising it to and lowering it from, it's hanging position, so I'll leave it alone.

    Henry.
     
  7. Mackburner

    Mackburner United Kingdom Founder Member Subscriber

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    Interesting to see the lamp running with the top cowl. When Jim was here a few months ago he gave me a top cowl but also told me that the top reduces the light considerably so people often removed them which is why they are so often missing. ::Neil::
     
  8. Jim Currie

    Jim Currie United Kingdom Subscriber

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    A very nice job Henry, firstly re the filler cap, I have some new valve stems hear and can put one in the post if you want, just send me a private message. You will find a cork pip always works best in the NRV in the filler cap as it dose not have a strong spring fitted. We found out many years ago that although Tilley pips are the same size it meant it needed a lot stronger spring to get a good seal, thus making it a lot harder to pump the lamp up. I will have a look for some cork pips for you.

    My father looked after about 80 double Blanchard's in our local market from 1945 to 1970 when the market was electrified, in all that time top cowls where never used as they cut the light output considerably. The only time they would really be needed is if the lamp was being used outside in heavy rain. Other than that they can cope with most conditions with out the top cowl. Jim
     
  9. Henry Plews United Kingdom

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    Thanks Jim.
    I recently had a look at what little Blanchard paperwork I have and there is mention of the NRV cork pip. Now you (and others) probably already know this but for those who don't know:-
    if the pip is not sealing properly, it can often be rejuvenated by rubbing it on an oil stone.

    Not being able to find my oil stone, I laid a piece of P600 grade wet and dry paper on the table and gently stroked the cork pip over it a few times until the surface was flat and smooth.
    It worked a treat. Even without the valve stem, the lamp has been holding pressure for over 4 hours now.
    I must try and remember this little trick for future encounters with cork seals.

    Henry.
     
  10. David Shouksmith

    David Shouksmith United Kingdom Founder Member

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    Tell me all about it, Henry! :doh: I usually just end up going out and buying another one... :roll: ](*,)
     
  11. Henry Plews United Kingdom

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    David, I used to but now I don't because within moments of getting the new item home, I trip up over the original. I've lost count of the folding pruning saws I now have.

    Henry.
     
  12. David Shouksmith

    David Shouksmith United Kingdom Founder Member

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    :-k Now you mention it, I think I may have three pruning saws - no idea where they are, though...:doh::whistle: :lol:

    I usually find what I've been looking for last week when I'm looking for something else this week - which I'll almost certainly find next week. I recently bought a tool chest (at vast expense!) and make sure I put stuff away now. It's about a cubic metre in size so I think I'm unlikely to lose that. However, it has got castors so I can't be absolutely sure...
     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2017
  13. Henry Plews United Kingdom

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    Get 'em welded up, it'll not go far.

    Henry.
     
  14. David Shouksmith

    David Shouksmith United Kingdom Founder Member

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    Or I could just take them back off again - would that work d'you think? ;) :lol:
     
  15. Henry Plews United Kingdom

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    I guess taking them off would work. Depends on whether or not you want to get down on your knees and weld in situ or, you empty it so you can turn it over to get at the nuts / bolts. Of course with the latter, you run the risk of items becoming misplaced, unless of course, you purchase another chest
    (without castors) to put them in for safe keeping whilst you carry out the operation.
     

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