Ca. 1930 Bre heater

Discussion in 'BRÉ' started by Conny C, Jul 10, 2013.

  1. Conny C

    Conny C Sweden Subscriber

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    Hi all,

    This is a ca. 1930 - Bre kerosene/gasoline parabolic heater. I’ve had this in parts in my drawer for about a year now and I decided it was time for a restoration. Not any cleaning or polishing needed, but some fettling to do with this one.

    First I had to fix a small hole in the steel bottom plate of the tank. I soldered that and it was okay holding pressure. I also had to do some restoration of the pump and manometer and that also went according to plan. Finally I had to get the burner unit with pricker control functionally. The pricker rod and needle was missing so I had to make a new rod and fit a Primus needle onto the pricker base. I tested it for pressure and it still leaked in the connection of the pricker control outside knob and pricker tube. With some testing with Teflon seal I managed to get the system tight. Now I was excited of how it would perform.

    The heater fired up nicely and it was really giving a good output of heat, though I didn’t need that in the Swedish summertime warmth (20C). This turned out to be a good performer heater and I might say the best good looking I’ve seen. Not often you see a porcelain handle of any pressure appliances, nor a porcelain pricker control knob.

    Btw. - I was lucky to find information of this heater today. I have several hollow wire Bre lamps as well as a table lamp. Michel B. has also displayed a table lamp here on the forum. Most of the info up till now of this Bre (Bregier, Deligne & Cie) company has been of butane/propane gas lamps. The paperwork of pressure appliances has not surfaced until today when I found two catalogues pages with pressure related stuff. So according to these pages my heater would be an nr. 542 Bre portable parabolic radiator.
    Have a nice summer!

    /Conny


    1373490025-Bre_heater.jpg 1373490322-Bre_heater_1.jpg 1373490374-Bre_heater_parts.jpg 1373490409-Bre_heater_burner_unit.jpg 1373490423-Bre_heater_jet_and_needle.jpg 1373490481-Bre_heater_manometer.jpg 1373490496-Bre_heater_top_burner_parts.jpg 1373490529-Bre_heater_parabolic_disc.jpg 1373490561-Bre_heater_blue_flame.jpg 1373490582-Bre_heater_burning_1.jpg 1373490600-Bre_heater_burning_2.jpg 1373490618-Bre_heater_and_catalogue_image.jpg
     
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  2. Shed-Man R.I.P.

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    That is a beautiful heater. I love the porcelain handle and control knob. Very well done for restoring it so well, and thank you for showing it. Steve.
     
  3. JEFF JOHNSON

    JEFF JOHNSON United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Hello Conny, that is a very good looking heater! :thumbup:
     
  4. John

    John Subscriber

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    That's a very elegant heater Conny.
     
  5. Michel

    Michel Subscriber

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    hello Conny
    as usual, a good looking french heater and a very beautifull restauration you have done here ;-)
     
  6. Conny C

    Conny C Sweden Subscriber

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    Thanks guys,
    Yes, a very stylish heater but maybe a bit too complicated ;) .

    /Conny
     
  7. David Shouksmith

    David Shouksmith United Kingdom Founder Member

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    Well, it's French - what else would you expect... :roll:
     
  8. Conny C

    Conny C Sweden Subscriber

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    Well David………good design and intriguing technical solutions is what was expected of the French back then. The French technical skills nowadays are probably more developed towards functionality and endurance. The most successful F1 cars (Red Bull) the last years are powered by Renault engines.

    /Conny
     
  9. Michel

    Michel Subscriber

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    hehe !! the old war between French and English people is not extinguished, isn't it ?
    thank you, Conny ;-)
    I think I am going to be able to amaze you (and David perhaps ??) with a beautifull exemple of a French lamp, one of the next days.
     
  10. David Shouksmith

    David Shouksmith United Kingdom Founder Member

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    No, I'm not intending to start or re-kindle a war at all. =; Stylish but over-complicated - two typical French characteristics, that's all. No criticism intended whatsoever.

    Some of those Citroens you made - I don't think they understood them completely even at the factory that made 'em... :whistle: :p
     
  11. Michel

    Michel Subscriber

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    Citroen have made the famous 2 CV and this was a very very simple car (1948/1990)
    and Citroen was the first firm who succeded in travelling all across the Middle East and up to China in 1931/32 including the Gobi Desert (after the Sahara and black africa)
    http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Croisiere_jaune
    http://www.classics.com/retro04.html
    and they have done the trip with french lamps ;-)
    bad choice my dear David :-))
    Simple and technically adequate
    and I don't talk about the "traction avant" and the "DS"
    but we sign the armistice, would you?
     
  12. David Shouksmith

    David Shouksmith United Kingdom Founder Member

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    Sorry, Michel. It was just meant to be a little humorous and not taken seriously as you and Conny seem to have done - but too subtle, obviously...
     
  13. loco7lamp

    loco7lamp Subscriber

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    Superb restoration :clap: :clap: :clap: 8) :thumbup: , well done :mrgreen: :D :thumbup:

    Best regards Stu :D :thumbup:
     
  14. Mackburner

    Mackburner United Kingdom Founder Member Subscriber

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    Many years ago I used to classify lamps by national type. So English were Tilley and Bialaddin and German was Petromax and Coleman types American. In fact this was not a sensible way to look at lamps so I pretty well forgot about it. However there is no doubt there is a distinctly French type. More to do with style than engineering pehaps although it does seem that French engineers tended to find a way of making lamp burners that owes little or nothing to any other makes from around the world. They certainly made some very stylish and good looking lamps but the works and engineering can be complicated. Over complex? Well maybe but then take a look at a Blanchard. What I do know is they tend as a breed to fettle and work well no matter how old so that means the engineering was good if a little strange to us more used to the simpler burner types.

    War between French and English? Perish the thought. ::Neil::
     
  15. Michel

    Michel Subscriber

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    Hello Neil
    You think that Blanchard lamps are complicated ??
    Without doubt because "Blanchard" is originally ... a french name. :lol: :lol: :lol:
    It could be a men with white hair (from "blanc" = white)
    you can find many Blanchard families in Normandy
     

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