Coleman 220E disassembly

Discussion in 'Fettling Forum' started by ColinG, Oct 12, 2019.

  1. ColinG

    ColinG United Kingdom Subscriber

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    I've got as far as this...

    IMG_20191012_171047_9.jpg

    The nut that fixes the frame down (under the pricker mechanism) has been loosened but what now? Something must unscrew or turn or... something but what?
     
  2. Mackburner

    Mackburner United Kingdom Founder Member Subscriber

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  3. ColinG

    ColinG United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Amazing, thanks. Now I know what to do - I figured I would have to unscrew the pricker assembly but I defintely didn't want to force it!

    Thanks.
     
  4. Mackburner

    Mackburner United Kingdom Founder Member Subscriber

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    To be honest it's been so long since I had one of these apart I couldn't remember how it came apart. I don't particuarly like the later 220/228 series so I haven't worked on one for maybe 15 years. I remember it was tricky if you didn't know how so I took the easy way out there. ::Neil::
     
  5. ColinG

    ColinG United Kingdom Subscriber

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    The burner assembly came out relatively easily but the screw that secures the upper, cast mixing chamber to the down tube is corroded solid. Unless I need to separate them I'll leave well alone for the time being. The hood fastening bolt is extremely rusted as you can see so I might leave that alone too.

    IMG_20191013_130056_3.jpg

    The frame has rusted but not too severely. Some rust treatment and a respray will probably suffice but I have a new frame on its way anyhow.

    IMG_20191013_130212_6.jpg

    The fount looks sound. The rust seemd to be surface only.

    IMG_20191013_130252_6.jpg

    IMG_20191013_130339_7.jpg

    IMG_20191013_130354_2.jpg

    IMG_20191013_130400_6.jpg

    You can just about see 12 and 62 stamped on the bottom. Some of the rust patches need careful checking as well.
     
    Last edited: Oct 14, 2019
  6. Mackburner

    Mackburner United Kingdom Founder Member Subscriber

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    Yes those rusted bolts should probably be left. You just need to make sure there are no residents in the tubes and mixing chamber. The rest seems to be mainly cosmetic. Should turn out to be a good working lamp. ::Neil::
     
  7. george

    george United States Subscriber

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    A pipe cleaner or one of those zip ties usually clears out most unwanted critters in the tubes. I would leave the screws alone on the burner assembly. Unless there's a real stubborn blockage it's usually not necessary to remove those screws. Ain't broke, don't fix it![-X
    This should turn out very nice, just don't rush it. ;)
     
  8. ColinG

    ColinG United Kingdom Subscriber

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    So far so good... but... the valve assembly is stuck in there extremely tight and does not want to budge so I think I'll leave it in place. I'd like to check the fuel pick-up as it might have been used with regular unleaded gas/petrol in the past but I'm worried about buckling the fount.I even tried locking the valve assembly in the vice (between aluminium jaw covers) and turning the fount instead but there was no movement.

    2019-10-15 19.03.50.jpg

    2019-10-15 19.04.57.jpg

    I've also poured some acetone/ATF into the pump tube as I suspect the NRV is stuck.

    2019-10-15 19.13.14.jpg

    The model number is still visible on the collar - just about! It really is an E not an F!
     
    Last edited: Oct 15, 2019
  9. ColinG

    ColinG United Kingdom Subscriber

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    This was the fuel that was in it when it came to me. It smells like brake cleaner or panel wipe, not petrol but it looks yellow and dirty.

    2019-10-15 19.19.07.jpg
     
  10. JEFF JOHNSON

    JEFF JOHNSON United Kingdom Subscriber

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    It's progressing!:thumbup:
     
  11. Blueflame Canada

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    If you can manage to clamp something to the bung (not the fount) so it is solid you could then try removing the valve. This way there is no danger of spinning the bung in the fount and having a disaster on your hands. Yes, easier said than done, but otherwise you may have to heat the bung to expand it a bit and then cool the valve body with ice to "shrink" the brass.
     
  12. Norman

    Norman United States Subscriber

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    Hi Colin,

    If you have a vise and pad the jaws then you can maybe loosen the valve assembly but if it is still stubborn try to tighten it just a bit because this will loosen it up that is if you can get it to turn.

    Cheers,
    Norman
     
  13. Mackburner

    Mackburner United Kingdom Founder Member Subscriber

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    Sounds to me you would be better trying the lamp first. Those valves can be very tight in the tank and it would be a shame to destroy the tank if the fuel pick up is working OK. Try it with a small amount of fuel. Don't need to assemble the lamp just tank and valve. Give it a little pressure and open the valve a half to one turn or so, that should give you fuel and air. Open all the way should close off the air and give fuel only. If it does that OK then leave the valve be. ::Neil::
     
  14. ColinG

    ColinG United Kingdom Subscriber

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    I think you're right Neil.

    I've been soaking the pump tube to free the NRV so now I'll make sure the fount pressurises OK and fuel passes though the pickup and out the valve. If that works I'll take things further.
     
  15. ColinG

    ColinG United Kingdom Subscriber

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    I've passed fuel the wrong way through the valve and into the fount so there's no blockage there. However, the NRV was soaking in acetone/ATF mix over night but it's not moving. I reassembled the pump but there's total resistance to pumping air into the tank. I'll do the same again tonight but assuming I can't get it moving, would anyone in the UK or preferably Scotland have a Coleman NRV removal tool they could lend me?
     
  16. george

    george United States Subscriber

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    There is a remote possibility the air tube that starts at the pump barrel where the NRV is located and stops just above the top of the tank, this could be clogged. Hopefully, it's the pump NRV and not that air tube! That tube simply lets you pump air into the font/tank "above" the fuel line in the tank. For the most part you actually don't pump air into the fuel. It's pumped above the fuel level. No fuel will come back through line. If the system fails only air should come back through the pump barrel.
     
  17. george

    george United States Subscriber

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    The fuel pump check valve/NRV can usually be removed with a large screw driver. If you have a lot of trouble removing it, don't force it. All it will do is destroy the check valve (it's brass).
    Good luck!
     
  18. Mackburner

    Mackburner United Kingdom Founder Member Subscriber

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    You might try and poke a wire through the NRV. It's a steel ball and if it's bound up wth crud a tap might just free it off. George is right and a big screwdriver might do the job but a removal tool is better. Less chance of destroying the brass fitting. Like the tank valve the NRVs are in there TIGHT. If you plan on working with Coleman then it is well worth buying the tool from OCP. I have an old one which is not quite right for some valves and a new one will do the job easily every time. It is a gizmo I have been considering buying new for a while now. ::Neil::
     

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