Coleman BQ

Discussion in 'Wall brackets. PB, BQ, BQF. 102K' started by Rob Garcia, Dec 22, 2014.

  1. Rob Garcia

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    1419257563-A.jpg

    1419257581-B.jpg 1419257591-C.jpg 1419257603-D.jpg 1419257614-E.jpg 1419257628-F.jpg

    This lamp has always been in our barn in Norfolk. Was certainly used by my grandfather until 1944. Likely bought locally in Norwich, or possibly London. The shade may or may not be associated with it. I seem to remember a pump lying around but regrettably that's now lost.

    No markings anywhere apart from patent dates as shown in picture.

    What have I got here? If it is a Kildark that would figure quite nicely as the old man was always "careful" and not spend money on brands!

    Seems complete and in good nick other than some rotten wick in the curly vaporiser tube and oxidation of the steel parts. No signs, to my eyes, of any repairs. The nickel plating is battleship grade!

    I'd like to get it going but perhaps you guys can give me some pointers first. My main collection is old whale oil and wick lamps so this is something of a departure. We've puzzled about this lamp for years.
     
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  2. pete sav

    pete sav Founder Member

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    Hi rob think the dated tubes are from a Coleman bracket lamp lamp is probably Coleman too
    Cheers pete
     
  3. David Shouksmith

    David Shouksmith United Kingdom Founder Member

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    The shade looks just like the one on my Kildark K232 - http://0flo.com/index.php?threads/6388
     
  4. Wim

    Wim Subscriber

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    The fount and swan-neck looks eggzactly like my Coleman wall hanger! There should be some text to be found on the wall-side of the fount, but my guess is 1922-'23 or very close by if no date is found. Coleman started dating their ware in 1924 I've learned on this forum! :D/ :lol:
    It is still possible to find a "new" vaporiser tube, a Q77 or Q99 are purrfect, but an R55 will work equally well, with the added advantage of a build-in pricker!
    These lamps are very easy to work on and very reliable too. You can use Coleman #20 or #21 mantles or any of the cheapo "no name" ones, as long as they are 'U' shaped (so not the 'wide' bulbs).

    Oh, btw, welcome on board! ;)

    Best regards,

    Wim
     
  5. JEFF JOHNSON

    JEFF JOHNSON United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Welcome aboard Rob and that is a Coleman wall/bracket lamp and it should restore well enough, there are other members of this forum who live in Norfolk, so perhaps assistance will be offered.

    The build quality of your lamp is excellent, but you will need a pump, the link below shows a post on lamp pumps, perhaps the pump for your lamp will be in the barn, Jeff.

    http://0flo.com/index.php?threads/2814
     
  6. Rob Garcia

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    Thanks very much guys. Seems the consensus is a Coleman BQ from about 1923.

    I think the pressure lamp bug has bitten me now! Just bought a Coleman CQ table-top lamp off Ebay complete with pump. When that arrives I'll know if the pump fits. With any luck the generator will be in working order too.

    Going back to the BQ - Wim I've found your topic from September 2012 which raises the issue of whether to solder the goose neck onto the tank. Mine clearly has traces of solder on the thread but actually unscrewed very easily.

    I'm wondering if the thread was just lightly tinned before being screwed in rather than actually hot soldered? I think I'll try applying a film of soft tin and see if that leaks first. Actually making a fused solder joint seems a bit drastic.

    There is still some asbestos wicking material in the generator too - I've unblocked the nipple hole and can just about blow through the tube by mouth pressure. I'll try it like that first before thinking of replacing the generator.

    Ordered some Coleman #20 mantles and Coleman fuel too. Will get back on progress as and when.

    Thanks again guys - all extremely helpful.
     
  7. Mackburner

    Mackburner United Kingdom Founder Member Subscriber

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    These Coleman Quick-Lite lamps and lanterns are just about the simplest lamps to fettle around. Clean out the air tubes and make sure the fuel feed is clear and you are good to go. Often the biggest problem is the air inlet valve. That is a 1/8" steel ball and if it is slightly corroded the valve passes back and it can be difficult to make pressure. The generator can be restored but easier to just fit a new R55. These are solid and very well made lamps and nearly always restore to run well. ::Neil::
     
  8. Henry Plews

    Henry Plews Subscriber

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    Hi Rob, a bit late now that you've already ordered Coleman fuel but many of us here in the UK use ASPEN 4 in our petrol / Coleman fuel lamps (and stoves). Not cheap but about half the price of C/man fuel and does the same job, i.e. burns very cleanly and doesn't clog the vapouriser.

    http://www.aspenfuel.co.uk/

    http://www.aspenfuel.co.uk/dealers/dealer-locator/
     
  9. Rob Garcia

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    Thanks Henry, very interesting - especially as it turns out my local farm machinery suppliers stock it.

    In fact I only bought 3 litres of Coleman fuel so not much harm done.

    Thanks again for the tip :idea:
     
  10. Henry Plews

    Henry Plews Subscriber

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    Hi Rob, you're welcome. Happy fettling.

    Henry.
     
  11. Carlsson

    Carlsson Sweden Admin/Founder Member

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    I buy my Aspen directly from a pump. Many marinas here in Sweden provide it that way, and the price is just a tad bit more than regular car petrol.
    Just to go down to the sea and fill a 25 litres container up, and you'll have many, many hours of burning to look forward to. It doesn't get much cheaper than that. :content:

    1419781304-aspenb.jpg
     
  12. David Shouksmith

    David Shouksmith United Kingdom Founder Member

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    Postage or travelling between Sweden and the UK is a bit of a deal-killer...
     
  13. Wim

    Wim Subscriber

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    Oh, he only wants to make us jealous, David! :lol: :lol: :lol:

    Best regards,

    Wim
     
  14. David Shouksmith

    David Shouksmith United Kingdom Founder Member

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    Yeah, I know, Wim - he's a little tinker, isn't he... ;) :lol:
     
  15. Carlsson

    Carlsson Sweden Admin/Founder Member

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    It was rather meant as a hint for you to go and check in your own marinas, or similar places, and see what you might find there! :roll:
    Even if Aspen is a Swedish brand, I doubt that alkylate petrol on pumps are specific for Sweden alone. I wouldn't be surprised if atleast not the other Scandinavian countries have it.
    Might be worth a check in my opinion.
     
  16. David Shouksmith

    David Shouksmith United Kingdom Founder Member

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    Er, I think we already have, Christer.

    In the UK, it seems to be mainly used for horticultural activities such as lawnmowers and chainsaws. Most dealers are therefore inland. They're conspicuously absent from the coast for at least 50 miles both north and south of me - even though there are several marinas in that area...
     
  17. Carlsson

    Carlsson Sweden Admin/Founder Member

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    That's good David. Then we know the situation in your area...
    But that's only a very small part of the world, so I suggest we just simply let anyone who really is interested check for themselves where they live.
    If they happen to find a station or marina that actually carry alkylate petrol on pump, there's much money to save.
    Which is a good thing, right?
     
  18. Wim

    Wim Subscriber

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    Christer, I don't think we are as environmental friendly as your lot! Over here (and I think I can speak of the coastline starting in France via Belgium up to and including the Dutch coast and probably also including Portugal, Spain and Germany) boat owners use 2-or 4 stroke fuel from the petrol station, including any and all added chemistry :roll: ](*,) . Even most users of "gardening" machinery use car petrol. Only a small handful of people and some professionals use the more expensive Aspen fuels. I have some Aspen4 in the lawnmower and the wood chipper (if that's the correct word :-k ) and some Aspen2 in the chain saws but I know of very little other non-pro's using the stuff (to expensive!). Wish things were different!

    Best regards,

    Wim

    (Is Aspen4 available from the pump in Denmark? There is a chance we might go on holidays in Denmark this summer so I could full up then! :lol: )
     
  19. Carlsson

    Carlsson Sweden Admin/Founder Member

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    Wim, we're not very environmental friendly here in reality. :-$
    Personally I don't use alkylate petrol in any other stuff than lamps, blowlamps and stoves.
    Perhaps with the exception sometimes for the chain saws...
    To swap the regular petrol with alkylate gives a much better direct environment for yourself on those occasions when the air is still, as it often is on cold winter days, and you are felling in sort of a depression in the landscape where much of the exhaust will remain as a smog.
    Then you really feel the difference between the two fuels after a days work.
     

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