does a tool exist for this?? or a good way to do it???????

Discussion in 'Fettling Forum' started by Bruce Kuda, Oct 25, 2020.

  1. Bruce Kuda

    Bruce Kuda United States Subscriber

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    Does any one know if a tool exists for this-- or know a good way to do it?? one of my Lanterns valves will leak a little even when screwed down tight--- I think I need to dress the mating surfaces of the needle valve and seat~~ I might have a couple ideas but this particular valve would probably be impossible to replace if I screw it up---~~ here is a cut away valve from a 220 that I used in one of my classes to illustrate the internal workings of a valve--
    The valve I need to dress is not a 220 but the internal workings are the same.


    cwdw valve guts.jpg

    Thanks i advance for help or suggestions !!!
     
  2. Henry Plews

    Henry Plews Subscriber

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    I had a similar problem, a steel valve stem had become pitted with rust and the rough surface would not make a good seal against the valve seat. A good friend put the valve stem in his lathe and dressed the pointy end. I did not need to dress the seat.
     
  3. Tony Press

    Tony Press Antarctica Subscriber

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    @Bruce Kuda

    As Henry says, careful lathe work will fix it.

    If you’re worried the lathe might be too much try this:

    1. If there is a burr on the pointy end of the male stem, use very fine emery paper to carefully remove the burr.

    2. Then use cutting compound on the end of the stem and screw it in and out of the seat many, many times. That should make the surfaces match each other.

    Cheers

    Tony
     
  4. Bruce Kuda

    Bruce Kuda United States Subscriber

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    Thank you Henry and Tony-- good suggestions
     
  5. MikeO

    MikeO Subscriber

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    I've used a dremel tool abrasive stone chucked in a pin vise to gently clean up the valve seat.

    Mike.
     
  6. ROBBO55

    ROBBO55 Subscriber

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    To clean up the seat I have used valve grinding paste on the end of a piece of brass rod. The rod was a neat fit through the threaded section and shaped on the end to match the spindle taper.
     
  7. Bruce Kuda

    Bruce Kuda United States Subscriber

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    MIke and Robo-- thanks both good ideas !!
     
  8. David Shouksmith

    David Shouksmith United Kingdom Founder Member

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    No suggestions, Bruce, other than to say that's a neatly sectioned valve you have there... :thumbup:
     
  9. Bruce Kuda

    Bruce Kuda United States Subscriber

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    I did that to show guys how a valve actually works-- and I needed to get some internal measurements for modification to valves I use on my 316T arcs

     
  10. Fireexit1

    Fireexit1 United Kingdom Subscriber

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    I have used silicon carbide (Carborundum) powder mixed into a paste for fine work in the past. You can buy it in different grades and you mix it with oil to make paste. It is usally called lapping grit and is much finer than car valve seating paste from the auto store. The last brand I bought was made by Veritas of Canada, who also have a US address. I use 400 and 600 grit for most jobs.
     
  11. podbros

    podbros United Kingdom Subscriber

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    :thumbup:

    You can make your own grinding paste from the mill scale that comes off hot steel.. It's what the Samurai sword polishers use... Grind it as fine as you want and add the oil of your choice... It's free! :)
     
  12. peterthevet

    peterthevet Subscriber

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    One of the guys on CCF tinned (applied solder) the point of the valve stem to solve this problem. The tinned end is soft enough that it will conform to the "defect" on the other face and thus provide a perfect seal. Evidently the repair held up well to use. Apart from its effectiveness the beauty of this technique is that it is cheap, easy to apply, does not alter original parts (solder can be removed if required)and can be reapplied if required. The original poster has used the technique many times with great success. As yet I have not tried this so - as they say....your mileage may vary!!
     

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