Full Strength Vinegar V's A Coleman Hood (Vent)

Discussion in 'Fettling Forum' started by Matty, Feb 14, 2020.

  1. Matty

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    G'day all,

    One thing I can't stand is bad enamel on hoods. It doesn't matter what brand, if the hoods are no good, I don't display them. I generally don't bother to fettle the lamp or lantern.

    This hood was just such a hood that I didn't like. It has enamel missing and the remaining enamel was dull.

    I thought if I could remove the enamel I could nickel the hood. Sure, it won't be original but it would look much better - to me at least. Besides, if I nickel the hood, any future owner can always re-enamel it if they so wished. In other words, I'm not doing anything that can't be undone.

    Knowing how difficult it is to remove enamel, I put the hood in full strength vinegar to see what would happen. From a previous experience, when I forgot to remove a hood from vinegar and left it in overnight, the enamel went dull and had a whiteish film over it - from memory. Certainly, the hood went dull.

    I checked the hood after two days and it was dull but the vinegar didn't do much else to the enamel. I put the hood back and checked it a week later and the hood was still dull with no other effects on the enamel. I just checked the hood, 8 days after checking it last, and I got one hell of a surprise.

    The enamel on the hood was bright and shiny. The rust spots from the missing enamel have been blackened as the vinegar has killed the rust.

    I don't get it. All I can think of is that initially, the vinegar is attacking oxidisation of the enamel and that dulls the enamel. Once the vinegar has finished killing off that oxidisation the enamel returns to its original bright and shiny look? I really don't have a clue, perhaps someone may know what the dickens happened. :)

    ColemanHoodVinegar.jpg
     
  2. Jean J

    Jean J Subscriber

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    I’ve just dropped an unwanted Coleman hood into pure vinegar Matty and will see what happens to it. I’m with you on hoods, that’s my main reason for not keeping any Tilley 246s.
     
  3. JEFF JOHNSON

    JEFF JOHNSON United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Interesting!:thumbup:
     
  4. WimVe

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    Normally the chipping of enamel, which is almost pure glass, happens due to fast heating and cooling down.
    The metal part simply expands faser then the enamel, hence the cracking.

    So to remove enamel heat the hood up and cool it down rapidly in ice cold water.
    If you get if of nice and all the way is a guess.
     
  5. ColinG

    ColinG United Kingdom Subscriber

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    I guess it depends what you want to achieve. Here in the UK a lot of enamel hoods tend to be pitted and pock marked with rust to some degree... maybe it's our damp climate, who knows. I'd love to say all of my enamel hoods are perfect but the reality is pretty different. If I only displayed lamps with perfect hoods I think I'd be down to about 7 out of the 50 lamps I have!

    Enamel shouldn't be affected by vinegar, at least that's what I thought but I guess the water content could seep underneath the rusty edges and begin to lift more of it away so that's something to watch out for. I have a rust 'eater' that I use which works very well but you need lots of it. It's a green-grey gloop that looks like snot but it works and its safe on enamel. I have a green Bialaddin hood that I intend to treat with it so the rust goes back to steel... although it will rust again as soon as it's used.
     
  6. Gary Waller

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    I wonder if vinegar will work on this....

    489DECBD-CB2C-4A1E-856F-00A3B421267A.jpeg
    :lol::):):):lol:
     
  7. ColinG

    ColinG United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Sulphuric acid?

    Seriously, if that's yours you have your work cut out!
     
  8. JonD

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  9. Gary Waller

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  10. Tony Press

    Tony Press Australia Subscriber

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    Very good enamel should not be affected by vinegar, except through capillary seepage under the enamel (ditto other liquids).

    On the other hand I’ve had hoods on lamps where the enamel is easily affected by substances such as vinegar. One was on an Australian-made “Stormaster” where the hood enamel faded a bit when it was being cleaned. It must have not been enamelled properly. It came back to life, thankfully, with “T-cut” and elbow grease.

    Tony
     
  11. MYN

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    That's an interesting find, @Matty.
    I've had enamel hazed-up with acid treatments in an attempt to remove rust in chipped areas of the hood.
    I might re-visit this with vinegar.
     
  12. Matty

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    Myn and all. I'd like to point out that I didn't polish the hood. I simply washed it under running water and dried it. I looked at the hood again today to see if anything had changed once it had been exposed to air for a few days. All it did was amaze me again how incredibly well it came out.

    I'd also like to point out if you are going to do what I did and leave a hood in full strength vinegar for two weeks, do a test one first and be sure you are happy with the results. Please don't put a reasonably good hood in, I'd hate for it to be ruined.
     
  13. MYN

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    No harm trying. I'll test out with some cheap, current production enamelled steel mugs for a start.
     
  14. Matty

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    :thumbup:
     

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