High Temperature Paint

Discussion in 'Fettling Forum' started by Sedgman, Apr 11, 2021.

  1. Sedgman

    Sedgman Subscriber

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    I saw some new special stove paint two days ago, rated at 600 degrees C. Checked it twice, definitely Celsius. How close is this to being viable on a Tilley Hood that I would like to improve.

    From what I remember reading I thought it might just do the trick. At $33 a can I decided not to rush.=;

    Iain
     
  2. Tony Press

    Tony Press Australia Subscriber

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    Iain

    I’ve not yet found a high or very high temperature paint that works on a Tilley X246 hood (even the VHT brand paint that goes to 2000°F).

    Some of these paints last a while on FL6 hoods and the like, but they eventually deteriorate with prolonged use.

    I’ll see what I’ve got in the shed and we can try some at Staffordshire Reef.

    Tony
     
  3. ColinG

    ColinG United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Not even close. Temperatures go up to 1000 + degrees and start to degrade after a few firings. Added to this, most hight temp paints will be matt black.
     
  4. Sedgman

    Sedgman Subscriber

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    Noted; with thanks.
     
  5. AussiePete

    AussiePete Australia Subscriber

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    There is quite a quest for heat proof paint that can be successfully used for lantern hoods. To date, I believe that a suitable paint, and colour, hasn’t been found.
    The quest go on ........
    Cheers
    Pete
     
  6. Buggerlugs

    Buggerlugs Australia Subscriber

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    All great answers don't waste your money.
     
  7. rollschmidts

    rollschmidts Subscriber

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    Ich habe viele Farben und Hersteller ausprobiert, von denen keiner dauerhaft Temperaturen standhält, und die bis zu 600 ° C sind ebenfalls schwarz :-(
     
  8. MYN

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    If its rated at just 600deg C or so, continuous, that'd be fine on most hoods (because at 600 or so deg C, the metal hood should be glowing dull red incandescent). Whatever you see on the rattle-cans are merely intermittent ratings, not continuous.
    I'm not aware of any off-the-shelf paint that's rated at the advertised temperature ranges for continuous duty except for some speciallized industrial coatings. I'm aware of these being available only with flat or matt-colours.
    Any high or very high temperature paints containing organic or silicone binders would just deteriorate at those temperature ranges, at least partially(loosing its gloss at the same time) and leaving behind just the heat-resistant fillers on the metal surface.
     
  9. ColinG

    ColinG United Kingdom Subscriber

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    If you really want to refurbish the hood, there are places that will strip away the old enamel and re-enamel it for you. There is a guy in the UK who does it (at a price) and the results look good. Most colours seem to be available including red, black. green, blue and more 'specialist' colours such as pink or spotted!

    The only surface treatments guaranteed to withstand the continuous heat of a pressure lantern are vitreous enamel and electro-plating - either chrome, nickel or speculum, although I'm not sure anyone uses speculum these days or knows how to plate with it.

    Regards
    Colin
     
  10. John

    John United States Subscriber

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    Keep in mind that even vitreous enamel will eventually lose the battle with heat and rust, it’ll take 20 or 30 years of use; but it’ll happen.
     
  11. ColinG

    ColinG United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Very true, John. I guess the reality is that stainless steel and good quality chrome plating are the only finished that will truly last .
     
  12. David Shouksmith

    David Shouksmith United Kingdom Founder Member

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    :-k That's puzzled me for years. Speculum is an alloy so how can you electroplate with that? - the various metal ions would migrate separately (and probably at different rates) through the electrolyte from the anode to the cathode and I can't see how they would be able to re-unite in the correct proportions on the surface being plated. They'd need to be able to communicate with each other or have some sort of memory of how they were on the anode. It would be kind of similar to 'brass-plating' and I've never heard of that... :-s :? ](*,)
     
  13. MYN

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    It seems that such a technique exists. Here's one of the numerous patents explaning the art:-
     

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  14. podbros

    podbros United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Hum .. very interesting stuff :thumbup:

    I wonder if cyanides are still used as freely in electro-plating?
     
  15. David Shouksmith

    David Shouksmith United Kingdom Founder Member

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    ...and arsenic which is a constituent of speculum metal. :shock:

    Thanks MYN, that looks to be an interesting patent. I knew there must be a technique because speculum-plated Tilley lamps and lanterns exist but I'd no idea how it was done... :thumbup:
     
  16. ColinG

    ColinG United Kingdom Subscriber

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    I sometimes wonder how many industrial techniques and processes we've lost since the golden age of manufacturing. Apparently we would be hard pressed to build the original rail network nowadays, partly because of lost skill and partly due to health and safety regulations. I also watched a very interesting documentary that highlighted why we wouldn't be able to make a copy of the Saturn 5 because nobody has the high-level aluminium welding skills you'd need, and being hand built, the engines were all essentially one-offs!

    My father's generation thought nothing of stripping down an engine - my dad did it regularly - but now you'd invalidate the warranty if you touch anything under the bonnet of a modern car.

    I believe this is called 'progress'.
     
  17. Buggerlugs

    Buggerlugs Australia Subscriber

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    So true, this is why I have tried my best to pass on the knowledge that my father taught me.
    Lucky for me that my son was interested in using his hands and brain in building and pulling things apart and seeing how they work, then putting them back together.
    Also plenty of other things around the house landscaping, painting plumbing, building sheds extensions on the house ect ect, most importantly how to restore lamps, stoves and he loves the blow touches as well.
    So all in all he has a good idea of how to not rely on tradesman and some of them aren't even tradesman anymore, hopefully I have done my job the rest is in his hands now.
    I must say I couldn't spray like he can, also he was the one that taught me to polish my lamps, fathers can always learn from their sons well in my family anyway.
     
  18. ColinG

    ColinG United Kingdom Subscriber

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    I taught my son how to tear down and rebuild PCs and other electrical equipment and now he's better than me! As you say it passes down through the generations if it's encouraged ... as it should be!
     
  19. MYN

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    Hi all,
    The following aerosol paint isn't going to be what you'd find from your regular shopping sprees.
    Here's one of the speciallized industrial-type paints that I'd believe would fare without problems on a lantern hood. I might consider this to be the real VHT paint.
    Colour is cream. Technical datasheet as attached:-
    Z-Aerosol-zyp1.jpg
     

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  20. David Shouksmith

    David Shouksmith United Kingdom Founder Member

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    :-k Apart from the safety information saying it's for industrial use only and that the cream colour will "gray out" after the first heating, is it a gloss finish?
     
  21. MYN

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    From my previous excursions into similar inorganic high-temp coatings with organic carrier liquids, those gray outs seemed to go away with subsequent heatings once the carbon traces burn off.
    It does not say anything about gloss finish but I suspect it won't be.
    I'd guess it'll be matte unless some glassy components get fused over it upon firing.
     
  22. Vince

    Vince United States Subscriber

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    Hello,

    I have successfully used the high heat version of Rustoleum clear pain to prevent rust in the bare metal parts (I.e. “cage”, etc) of my Coleman 327.

    I applied two coats separated by an hour or so of dry time between. After several long periods of use, I have not found any chipping, peeling, discoloration, etc.

    I’ve attached a photo of the product I used. It provides a nice clear matte finish that does tend to glisten in direct sunlight, but otherwise has a good original appearance.

    perhaps the color version could be used to replicate the enameled appearance of an original vent.
     

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  23. ColinG

    ColinG United Kingdom Subscriber

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    We await the outcome with interest.
     
  24. David Shouksmith

    David Shouksmith United Kingdom Founder Member

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    You would be able to because those parts don't get hot enough to need high temperature paint. You can easily use car body enamel on those parts.

    Nope...
     
  25. MYN

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    You won't have problems using VHTs on the frame.
    Its on the lantern hoods and vents that commercial VHTs simply fail.
     

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