Lind-O-Lite 110

Discussion in 'Lind-O-Lite' started by Cigarman, May 18, 2015.

  1. Cigarman

    Cigarman Subscriber

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    Found this unassuming beastie at an antique store for a modest price and figured this would make a nice addition to the collection. Darned if I can figure out the model or date of manufacture. Very well made, simple and easy to clean up. Looks like someone may have broken the original glass in the 50's or so and put a Coleman one on. Also has what looks like an R55 Generator. I also discovered the whole burner and tubes were all steel instead of the usual brass that you see in Coleman lamps. Someone wanted these to last.

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    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 31, 2017
  2. JEFF JOHNSON

    JEFF JOHNSON United Kingdom Subscriber

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    That's a fine old lantern and there should be information stamped on the base plate of the tank and Neil may have more information, Jeff.
     
  3. Mackburner

    Mackburner United Kingdom Founder Member Subscriber

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    This is indeed a Lind-O-Lite 110(E). It is the first type with an external fuel feed from the carburettor valve. I have added a suffix to the model number because there are two types of 110. This one I have given 110(E) because of the external feed. The next one is 110(I) for an internal fuel feed. It will date from around 1928-1929. The generator on all Lind-O-Lite lamps is a Coleman so this one will be an R55. L&H only made pressure lamps from 1928 to 1938 and they are always solid and very well made products. I consider them to be by some margin to be the best ever made. The Rolls Royce of pressure lamps. Just look at this one. 1928 and damn near perfect except for a little flaking of the nickel. This is in fact quite normal for L&H lamps and it is rare to find a rough one.

    It is an Instant-Lite type. Open the carb valve a half turn to light and then open full to run.

    You will need to look at the seals in the valve arrangement and clean the tubes and such but these lamps generally work as well as they look. Have a look at the gallery for Lind-O-Lite because I know I show the carb valves in detail there.

    ::Neil::
     
  4. Cigarman

    Cigarman Subscriber

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    Thats great! Its nice to know what this creature is. You are right its built with high quality materials and has stood the test of time.

    Jeff, yes it was stamped with "LH" and then Lindemann and Hoverson, made in Milwaukee, WI. They didnt stamp the model # on however so its good that Neil knows his stuff. :)

    I will definitely give the plumbing a go-over since its a bit iffy starting up and doesnt run that bright even with full pressure. I found that these pump up with little effort and you almost dont know how much pressure you have in the tank its so easy. Believe it or not the pump leather still works. Amazing.
     
  5. Mackburner

    Mackburner United Kingdom Founder Member Subscriber

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    Start up is always a bit iffy. This was early days for Instant-Lite and they can splutter a bit. If it is running dull then probably wants a new generator and a good clean out of the air tubes. ::Neil::
     

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