Primus 1325

Discussion in '1325' started by Mick Emm, Dec 26, 2010.

  1. Mick Emm

    Mick Emm Founder Member

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    Hi !
    Can someone tell me what I'm looking at here ?
    I have a friend in Holland or maybe its better to say Netherlands never know which is more acceptable. Theo's the name and he's a lamp collector and often sends me pics. of fantastic rare/ish ! lamps he finds.
    Recently got these pics. I have a table lamp with bracket top and slip ring to allow outer shade to fit on ( 995 ) but this appears different again.
    I don't have it in my paperwork ?
    I can't get the pics. any bigger as Theo sends me a note and thumb nail pics on same sheet where as he used to send them as attachments which opened into big pics. ...mick

    1293322700-P1.jpg 1293322714-P2.jpg 1293322731-P3.jpg 1293322743-P4.jpg
     
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  2. Nils Stephenson

    Nils Stephenson Founder Member

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    Well this is an easy one. It is a Primus 1325, which is an alcohol version of the normal 1025. It is a 300cp table lamp with a parchment shade. Can't remember if we have one in the gallery yet, but they are almost identical to the 1015 parchment shade version, except for the burner. The 1325 was made during the WW2 era when there was a shortage of kerosene.
     
  3. Mick Emm

    Mick Emm Founder Member

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    Thanks Nils !
    Out of curiosity why would paraffin be in short supply but not alchole during the WW2.
    Tooling up to make alchole burning storm lamps would have cost alot so Primus must have been sure of the market,I think I'm right in remembering Sweden remained Neutral during the war years ,so were they able to sell their lamps to other countries or was the alchole lamps purely for use in sweden.
    ....mick
     
  4. Carlsson

    Carlsson Sweden Admin/Founder Member

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    Mick, alcohol is easily made within our country from the raw materials we got, e.g. grain or wood pulp, which we got a plenty.
    Paraffin on the other hand is derived from fossil fuels, and that's not one of our natural resourses.
    During WWII (and also at the very end of WWI), practically all of the very sparse fossil fuel we got was reserved for the army.
    Therefore we adapted many of the paraffin lamps to be able to run on alcohol.
    Actually even the dreaded blow lamps were converted! :shock: ;)
    And that's also the reason why carbide lamps for indoor use are quite common here. They came out of the closets during both these large wars, just to get back in again as soon as the paraffin was available again...
     
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  5. Mick Emm

    Mick Emm Founder Member

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    Hi Christer !
    Thanks for the history ! Regards mick
     
  6. Nils Stephenson

    Nils Stephenson Founder Member

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    Actually it wouldn't have cost them that much. basically all they did was change the jet and cleaning needle and put a restrictor in the air tube. Then they soldered a new number plate over the original number of the lamp or lantern (or blow torch :lol: ) They did actually produce a new cleaning needle rod in two parts with a small piece of brass net in between. Probably to keep all the twigs and stuff away from the jet from the home made alcohol.

    They also sold conversion kits to suit any lamp with the 1020 burner and the 991 burner.
     
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