Pros and Cons of Using 'Amish Mix'...

Discussion in 'Pressure Lamp Discussion Forum' started by Centurion13, Jan 24, 2022.

  1. Jacob van Pareen South Africa

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    Myn,
    What an exhaustive reply!

    Congrats and thanks!
    After hours and hours of research and literature study, I agree 100% with your answer!

    I standardised on A1 jet fuel and Benzine, (not Benzene), for my Amish mix.

    Question; would the Antifreeze in A1 jet fuel have any negative effects as lantern fuel in my "Amish mix"?

    Thanks.
     
  2. MYN

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    Jacob,
    It was almost a year ago since I posted the reply. I almost couldn't recall what I've mentioned back then :-k. I nearly fainted from exhaustion re-reading that :p.

    Since you're using Jet-A1, the antifreeze would not be the usual ethylene glycol mixtures as the ones you'd find for the coolant systems on terrestrial vehicles.
    The antifreeze for aviation fuels like Jet Fuels would have more fanciful or specific names like Fuel System Icing Inhibitors.
    These are mostly in the form of the various types of glycol ethers. On their own, they are rather hygroscopic, which means that they'd attract moisture in the open. Example, sometimes they'd use Ethylene-Glycol-Monomethyl-Ether or Diethylene Glycol Monomethyl Ether. These chemicals are miscible with water and are in fact, more soluble in water than the kerosene-type fuel in Jet-A1. They behave a little like ethanol in this respect: perfect dissolution with water in any ratios, or completely miscible.
    Fortunately, the amounts are very small in the Jet Fuels, say, around 0.1~0.15%v/v. Not sure if you'd find the info in the specific MSDS for the Jet-A1 you're using.
    If you are storing leftover mixes containing Jet-A1 in any of your lanterns' founts for long periods with the pressure relieve opened(such as in a Petromax, Butterfly or similar clones), you might get slightly more moisture being attracted in. It could still be in 'dissolved form' within the fuel. Chances are, you won't see them separating out as droplets at the bottom of the fount. I'd say, that isn't such a big deal. Just use up all the fuel in every lantern operation and use fresh fuel mixes for each operation. Do not make and store large quantities of Amish Mixes with it when you can't use them up soon enough. I don't know whether Jet-A1 is more storage-stable as compared to clean, regular kerosene or not. Although the antifreeze or rather, anti-icing additive is a potent biocide, the amounts are too small to be effective for such function in the fuel.

    In summary, that means to say...yes, you can safely use Jet-A1 as a constituent in your intended Amish Mixes, without overly high concerns about any potential negative effects.
    Performance-wise, it is unlikely to find conceivable difference whether or not the Jet-A1 has the antifreeze being mixed-in.
     
  3. Jacob van Pareen South Africa

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    Thanks Myn.
    I will thus stay with jet-A1, as I believe the quantity control for aircraft fuel will be more stringent!
     
  4. Matti Kucer

    Matti Kucer Sweden Subscriber

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    Hello!

    Regarding
    Is there anyone in Sweden that can direct me to eqvivalent product on the swedish market?

    I have found this product labeled as detergent. Is it usable?
    https://www.bauhaus.se/bensin-nitor-rengoring-1l


    Regards Matti
     
  5. MYN

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    I think the Nitor Bensin from Bauhaus is still usable on lanterns/stoves that operate on volatile naphtha type fuels.
    It is not a direct equivalent to Coleman Fuel.
    It is nearly 100% Naphtha (petroleum), hydrotreated, light having a CAS Nr. 64742-49-0.
    (Zippo lighter fluid has about 25-50% of the type of naphtha stated above).
    This Bensin might contain up to 2% of cyclohexane with the CAS nr: 110-82-7

    ***Coleman Fuel contains almost entirely a chemical with an official name of : Distillates, petroleum, light distillate hydrotreating process, low boiling
    with the CAS No. 68410-97-9.

    I believe you can also use alkylate gasoline as a substitute. Alkylate gasoline does not share the negative traits of regular pump gasolines for this purpose.
    For instance Aspen 4. I think it is available in Sweden. Better to avoid Aspen 2, which also contains some 2T oil.
    Otherwise, you might try the equivalent: Alkylate 4 from Grimsholm Products AB in Sweden.
    I think this product is also available from Bauhaus Sweden.
     
  6. Matti Kucer

    Matti Kucer Sweden Subscriber

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    Thanks @MYN for Your answer.

    Yes we have Aspen 4 fuel. I have it already as fuel to my Klippo/Honda lawn mover.
    Great that I can use it to mix with kerosene.

    Regards
     
  7. Jacob van Pareen South Africa

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    Any news on light output with straight kerosene?
     

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