Punker 80 Carbide Lantern

Discussion in 'Open Forum' started by Ray3, Feb 12, 2020.

  1. Ray3

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    Hello,
    I'm new to the forum and I'm not really sure where to start but I have done a bit of poking around to see what I can come up with about the punker 80 carbide lanterns and have not found a whole lot about them... other than some history. I have but one question, that I can think of for now, and that is are there instructions that I can get for it and knowing it's a swedish lantern it would be nice to have the instructions in English if possible.
    Thanks
    Ray
     
  2. Carlsson

    Carlsson Sweden Admin/Founder Member

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    The instructions for these are in Swedish, sorry.
    Since you say it's the lantern, I assume it's either the one with four plain glasses or the one with the cylindrical mesh? Not the one with the round globe?
    All versions can be seen below, and they are all called No.80.
    I'll attach the instruction aswell (for the Primus version. They are the same as Punker), but as I said; they are always in Swedish. Perhaps you can get something out of it anyway.

    Instructions are not really necessary. They run the same way as any drip fed carbide lamp.

    Make sure that the rubber gasket between the two parts are good and is sealing as it should. You normally test this every time you light a carbide lamp by sweeping a lit lighter or match around the rim just after you have lit the lamp. If you have a leak, you will directly see it from a yellow and sooty flame that will occur there.
    Also make sure that you have the correct water tank lid. You must NEVER run a carbide lamp without the water tank lid, or if the safety holes in it has been enlarged.
    Always fill the water tank to top level, even if you just load a very little amount of calcium carbide for a shorter run time.


    typ26_p80ly.jpg typ26_p80lynat.jpg typ26_p80la.jpg

    lantern_front.jpg lantern_back.jpg
     
  3. Ray3

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    Thanks for the reply and yes it is the standard model lantern I think like the first picture with the four corner pane glass shield... also thanks for the instructions on it. I realize that it's like any other lantern or lamp that uses calcium carbide and water to produce acetylene, but they're all a little different and having instructions on it is helpful and I might know someone who would be able to translate the instructions for me possibly. When I was looking at the lantern I noticed that the flame tip I do believe is integrated into the lantern so changing it out if it needs to be changed out can be difficult and that's if I can even find a new tip for it if I ever need a new tip.
    Thanks
    Ray
     
  4. Carlsson

    Carlsson Sweden Admin/Founder Member

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    By flame tip I guess you mean the burner?
    Ir should absolutely be changeable.
    They use the standard burner with the extreme taper.
    It should look like the last illustration in the instruction where they explain how to prick the two orifices of the burner.
    I may do a quick translation of the instruction tomorrow
     
  5. Ray3

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    If the burner can be changed then at first glance it doesn't look like it at least not without some kind of fuss also what I was trying to say or what I meant to say is that I don't think the burner is threaded on or pressed in I think it's one with the lantern or one with the stem. If you would be willing to translate the instructions possibly tomorrow I would very much appreciate that thank you. Otherwise I could probably get one of my dad's co-workers who is from Sweden I do believe to translate it for me. Sorry if my writing isn't really making any sense right now it's kind of all over the place I know.
     
  6. Carlsson

    Carlsson Sweden Admin/Founder Member

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    Can you post a picture of your burner tip?
    It should be easy to unscrew, but perhaps someone has glued or soldered it in place.
     
  7. Ray3

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    Alright I can do that but it will have to be tomorrow though I got to go to work tonight.
     
  8. AussiePete

    AussiePete Australia Subscriber

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    Welcome from Queensland Australia.
    Looking forward to seeing your pictures and to seeing and reading your future posts.
    Cheers
    Pete
     
  9. Ray3

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    Already here's three pictures of the lantern and I decided to take a look at the burner again and I gave it a little bit more effort trying to take the burner off and it does unthread and I think it wasn't coming off easily the first time because I'm guessing the lantern is kind of new-ish so the paint must have still been on there keeping it stuck or something but it does come off and will be easy to replace if I can find another burner that is.
    Ray

    IMG_20200213_111902.jpg IMG_20200213_111929.jpg IMG_20200213_111937.jpg
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 13, 2020
  10. Carlsson

    Carlsson Sweden Admin/Founder Member

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    That's good news! Then everything is normal.
    Yes it's good to be able to swap the burner. The soapstone they are made of is soft, and after some pricking, the two holes will be too large.
    They shall be of a pretty loose fit, hence the extreme taper. It's part of the safety system. The burner shall pop if the pressure inside gets too large, and too large in this case is very small since acetylene will explode if compressed to only around two atm.
    Normally they just recommended some soap for sealing the threads of the burner.

    And you got the little case for it too!
    Are there any spare glasses left in the retainer under the lid?
     
  11. Ray3

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    Nope no spare pieces of glass to replace the broken piece so probably have to make a new one or buy a new one somewhere... I do have the metal sheet that can be used for I do believe a reflector or to replace a broken pane of glass until a new pane of glass has been received. On another note though I do have a question about the lantern in regards to using it. Is it normal to have to stop the lantern every once in awhile to stir up the calcium carbide in the carbide chamber or do you just keep increasing the drip rate to make more acetylene. I've noticed that after it burns for a while the flame will be good but then it will die down and I'll blow out the flame and take the water chamber off and there will still be usable calcium carbide but for some reason the flame is dying down... does that mean I just have to keep increasing the drip rate of the water or do I have to take the water chamber off every once in awhile and stir up the calcium carbide in the carbide chamber. If you know cool if not also cool.
    Thanks
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2020
  12. Carlsson

    Carlsson Sweden Admin/Founder Member

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    No, you should never have to stir the carbide!
    Normally these will run with a pretty even flame for many hours without much fiddling once you have found the balance in it.
    It can take a while before all has been "normalised", but it shall not be loosing in light like that.

    Do you have the perforated tube inside the carbide container? And also the round disc that shall lay on top of the stones?
    The cylindrical bit is crucial since it's that part that make sure that the water attack the carbide from the bottom of the container.
    If the water is unguided, so to speak, it will make the carbide on top react instead of the one at the bottom as intended, and that will make the lamp hard to regulate since the lime that will be formed on top can interfere with the process.
    The lime made during the reaction shall always start to be built-up from the bottom and up during a light period.
     
  13. Ray3

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    Well the picture that I showed you with it lit was going for ~ few hours and I only filled the carbide chamber about half of what can be filled... the chamber shows a Mark that you do not go beyond with carbide I filled it halfway to that mark. I'm assuming everything is fine with the lamp because when I went to empty the carbide chamber all of the calcium carbide that I thought was still usable was actually a sludge and not usable so I'm assuming it was all used up like it should be. It's just kind of hard judging how long these lanterns should last on a charge of carbide... I'm not really sure per say especially with these kind of lanterns.
     
  14. Carlsson

    Carlsson Sweden Admin/Founder Member

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    They should easily run for five hours when filled to the mark, and at nominal flame. It all depends on which burner you got, of course, but since yours probably is the original (I think it was a 14 l/hr burner), the five to six hour run time should be pretty close to the truth if you use it on nominal flame. You probably ran yours a bit lower.

    I made a quick translation of the instruction above.
    As you can see, there's not really much there that you didn't already knew.



    Instructions.


    Filling: The water container is removed by unhooking the two eccentric locks. The Cover plate is taken out, after which the carbide container is filled with carbide up to the level mark of the container. Make sure that no carbide will come inside the perforated centre tube. Put the cover plate above the carbide.

    Water filling: Firstly make sure that the drip control screw is seated (turn clockwise), at the point that it feels closed, thereafter unscrew the water filling lid, fill up with water until the container is close to absolutely full, and reattach the lid.
    Check that the water is dripping when the control screw has been opened e.g. half a turn counter clockwise. Then close the screw again.

    Assembly: The water container is placed on the carbide container and locked in place with the two excenterlocks, after which the lantern is ready to be lit.

    Lighting the lantern is made by opening the water adjustment one half turn counter clockwise, after which water starts to drip down the centre tube of the carbide container and start to reach the carbide after which acetylene gas is produced. Open the glass and light the gas after about half a minute with a burning match held just next to the burner. Do not light the lantern with the water lid unscrewed.

    Extinguishing: In order to put the light out, completely shut the water control.
    The lantern will then keep on burning until the remaining gas is consumed. The flame could be put out by blowing after it has been reduced to the size of a pea.

    Cleaning the lantern: After the carbide is fully consumed, cleaning and re-charging must take place. As the first and final rule here, one must never open the lamp close to any open fire or flame. The cleaning should preferably be done in daylight and in the open. It is made in such a way, that when the lantern has been opened, the cover plate and the centre tube has been taken out, the sludge (slaked lime) shall be cleaned out.
    Use a wooden dowel or other suitable tool for this.
    Do also clean the cover plate and centre tube, making sure that all holes in the tube are cleared. After this, check the condenser felt, which in case it's wet shall be squeezed dry before re-attachment. Make sure that it is well out of the way from the drip spindle in order that no water can be absorbed by the felt as the lantern is running.
    After this, make sure that the rubber seal between the two containers is unharmed and well seated. Also check that the drip control is working, and then assemble the lantern.

    General instructions: If the flame is askew or small, extinguish it and clean the two jets with the attached pricker needle as seen in the illustration.
    The water filling lid is constructed with two holes, and inside with a fine mesh over them. The holes must be open in order to make the water drip. The metal mesh is to prevent ignition of the acetylene gas.
    NEVER USE THE LANTERN WITHOUT THE WATER LID.
    Filling of carbide should preferably be done directly before use. The humidity in the air will produce gas and odour. One filling of carbide will last for 5-6 hours. Never fill more carbide than for a calculated need of light.
    The carbide shall be stored in a well closed thin can. Protect it from moist, which will ruin the carbide and produce an odour.
    Avoid gas odour. See the instruction about extinguishing the lantern (above). The lantern must not be placed in an oven or close to a chimney which leads to any place where open fire might be used.
     
  15. Ray3

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    Awesome thanks for the translation of the instructions and just like I thought I knew but wasn't real sure the sludge does indicate that the carbide is all used up as it should be so again I'm assuming this lantern is running the way it should be for the most part. As for the burner I noticed that it has two prick holes and not just one prick hole so I don't 100% know what that would mean for burn time.
     
  16. Carlsson

    Carlsson Sweden Admin/Founder Member

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    They always have two holes. They are situated as in the last illustration of the instructions, which means that the jets of acetylene that stream out of each orifice will meet almost perpendicular. This is what shapes the flattened flame that's typical for acetylene burners.
     
  17. Ray3

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    Yeah it took me awhile for some reason to realize that the burner with two prick holes is the normal burner according to the illustration, anyways thanks again for all the help and the translation.
    Ray
     
  18. Carlsson

    Carlsson Sweden Admin/Founder Member

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    A pleasure!
    Good luck with the lantern, and use it often.
     

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