Repairing a broken cleaning pricker for an Austramax.

Discussion in 'Fettling Forum' started by ROBBO55, May 13, 2019.

  1. ROBBO55

    ROBBO55 Subscriber

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    Here is my method for replacing the broken pricker on an Austramax. However this method can be used for many other makes of lanterns.

    Materials.

    · Original cleaning needle. The main body of the cleaner is 2mm dia (major length). The crimped end (holding the pricker) is 1mm dia.

    · 1mm dia brass tube with nominal wall thickness of 0.3mm

    · 27 gauge hypodermic needle

    · Replacement pricker wire (0.15mm – 0.18mm) in my case the pricker wire is 0.15mm stainless steel spring wire.

    Method

    1. Measure the overall length of the brass rod (excluding the pricker). I find they vary slightly between lanterns.

    1.jpg

    2. Set up the Dremel (or similar device) with a cutting wheel. I use this for all cuts and trimming made during this process

    2.jpg

    3. Remove the 1mm end or the rod (which holds the broken pricker) and square of the end.

    3.jpg

    4. Using a lathe centre drill the brass rod.

    4.jpg

    5. Use a 1mm dia drill to drill a hole in the rod with a minimum depth of 6mm.

    5.jpg 5a.jpg

    I use a pin drill to hold the 1mm drill. The pin drill is loosely held in the drill chuck on the lathe as a guide only. With the lathe running I control the drill by hand to drill the hole (broke too many drills determining this).

    * Step 6 – 9 remember to remove the burs after each cut.

    6. Insert the 1mm brass tube into the drilled hole and mark the length measured in step 1 + a little for trimming in step 9. Cut the 1mm tube to length (don’t use side cutters).

    6.jpg

    7. Cut the plastic end off the hypodermic needle. I find it is easier to remove the burs if you insert a piece of pricker through the needle before cutting (don’t use side cutters).

    7.jpg

    8. Make sure all the pieces are pushed together then cut the hypodermic needle to match the length of the 1mm brass (don’t use side cutters).

    8.jpg

    9. Trim the overall length to match measurement taken in stage 1.

    9.jpg

    10. Remove the 1mm brass with the hypodermic needle inside. Insert a new pricker (after removing the cut off piece). Allow excess to be trimmed later.

    10.jpg

    11. Reassemble and make sure all the pieces are pushed together (recheck length) then crimp the assembly in place. Remove any burs. My crimper is a pair of pliers with a 1.5mm hole drilled through the jaw face. The tips of the jaws are ground so I can place the pliers in a vice if necessary.

    11.JPG

    12. Trim pricker to length and remove bur.

    12.jpg 13.jpg

    Done.
     
  2. Tony Press

    Tony Press Australia Subscriber

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    Excellent work and a great tutorial.


    Thanks, Martin


    Tony
     
  3. Sellig33

    Sellig33 France Subscriber

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    I agree too !! Thanks :thumbup:
     
  4. ROBBO55

    ROBBO55 Subscriber

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    Thank Tony and Gilles.
    I hope some of the information will be helpful to other members and their projects.


    @Tony Press , @Sellig33
     
  5. MYN

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    That's very useful info, Martin. Especially so for some of us (me included or perhaps me only?) that have virtually no access to any original spare parts.
     
  6. JEFF JOHNSON

    JEFF JOHNSON United Kingdom Subscriber

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    A very useful post!:thumbup:
     
  7. JonD

    JonD Subscriber

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    I love your crimper idea.
    What useful to do with those horrid pliers which they include in motor/bi/cycle repair kits.
    "Ain't no good for nothing else" Lynyrd Skynyrd
     
  8. ROBBO55

    ROBBO55 Subscriber

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    Thanks @MYN , @JEFF JOHNSON and @JonD .

    Myn , I look forward to seeing your next fettle. It's always interesting how you overcome your supply issues. :lol:

    Jon, you are right, they are useless pliers. that's why I used them. It didn't matter if I buggered them up. Even for this the handles were too short. Hence the grinding on the jaws. :-k
     
  9. MYN

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    Well, I've got a 1930s Coleman 237 thats missing the following parts:-
    1. Generator, pricker wire/rod, internal brass coils and the gas tip/jet.
    2. The insert piece and screw for the 3-piece filler cap.
    3. The brass bushing on the burner frame where the generator tip enters.
    4. The preheat spirit dish.
    5. The pricker control lever, gland nut and bushing.
    All of which I'll presume unavailable to me at this stage. There are no donors or new spares to be found around here. So I'll be making/ fabricating/machining them out.

    Also, the steel meshing on the burner is also detaching from its place. I"ll probably be making it as well.
    Kinda tied up lately to post a write-up on this.
    So its going to be a prolonged fettle for me.
     
  10. AussiePete

    AussiePete Australia Subscriber

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    A very good post, good detailed information, well done.
     
  11. ROBBO55

    ROBBO55 Subscriber

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    @AussiePete
    Thanks Pete.

    @MYN
    You certainly have a project there. Good luck with your 237.
     
  12. Graham P

    Graham P Australia Subscriber

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    A method I have used to cut thin brass and copper tube is to roll it carefully on a flat surface firmly under a sharp blade (Stanley or Exacto works well) and snap it off. (similar result to a rolling wheel pipe/tube cutter)
     
  13. ROBBO55

    ROBBO55 Subscriber

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    Thanks @Graham P for the suggestion. I'll give it a try next time.
     

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