Small spot rust removal on a painted fount

Discussion in 'Fettling Forum' started by Alex Smith, Jan 18, 2020.

  1. Alex Smith

    Alex Smith United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Evening all,

    I've picked up a Coleman 286 (1988) on my travels. She is not in bad condition, a bit rusty in places. I've no desire to strip her right back. Has anybody any tips or hints on how to sort out rust on the painted fount and the metal work please?

    Coleman 286_Original Condition.JPG

    Coleman 286_Original Condition 2.JPG
     
  2. ColinG

    ColinG United Kingdom Subscriber

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    I have used some rust remover gel that claims it doesn't affect paint. I've tried it with a nickel plated fount and it worked perfectly. It's called Rust Destructor Thick Gel and I got it from eBay. You have to apply a really thick coat but it works!
     
  3. Reese Williams

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    I would treat the fount and burner frame as separate projects. Remove the burner frame and use electrolysis or a rust chelating product (in the US Evaporust is a good choice). Getting rid of the spot rust on a painted fount is more difficult. If it was a 220 or 200a I'd say strip it and repaint as the decals are readily available. I don't know of anyone making reproductions of the 285/286/288 style decals. I have tried several times to salvage those type decals, never completely successfully. Coleman founts are prone to getting rust under the paint which doesn't show. Look carefully at the fount and see if there are tiny raised tracks in the paint. I call them worm tracks. If they're there that's rust under the paint.

    You can try mechanical removal with a small wire wheel on a Dremel type tool, sandpaper, steel wool or what we call here a rust eraser. A rust eraser looks like a whetstone but us actually grit embedded in a rubber matrix, like a hand held pencil eraser. They come in various shapes. YOu can also use chemical conversion by using something like phosphoric acid on a small applicator like a cotton swab. I use a product call Ospho which is phosphoric acid and is available at hardware stores.

    I'm in the US and am not familiar with what the equivalent UK products and sources are, maybe Colin or someone else can translate for us.
     
  4. ColinG

    ColinG United Kingdom Subscriber

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    As it's a modern Coleman you're sure to find someone selling replacement decals and the dark green should be easy enough to match. I guess it depends how confident you are at re-spraying.
     
  5. Alex Smith

    Alex Smith United Kingdom Subscriber

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    @ColinG and @Reese Williams thank you for taking the time to reply, all advice much appreciated. I'll have a crack with some of the techniques shortly - so far it has only had a soapy wash. Time to get learning new skills again!
     
  6. Reese Williams

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    @ColinG
    There are tons of the older Coleman parallelogram style decal being made, but I haven't seen any of the foil tape type for the newer (mid to late '80s) lanterns like the 288, 286 etc. I think those kinds of decals started with the 275, the poo brown model from the '70s. If anyone knows of someone making them I'd love to have a source. I've refurbed a bunch of 288s and have tried to salvage the decal with little success. There is a small but ready market there for someone with the skill.
     

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