Tilley EX100

Discussion in 'EX4-EX100-EX93' started by Tony Press, Sep 29, 2015.

  1. Tony Press

    Tony Press Australia Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2012
    Messages:
    6,826
    Location:
    Stinkpot Bay, Howden, Tasmania, Australia
    Here is the EX100 that I have just fettled (the before photos will be at the bottom of the post):

    1443519582-IMG_8028.jpg

    1443519620-IMG_8044.jpg

    1443519646-IMG_8047.jpg

    1443519680-IMG_8032.jpg

    1443519706-IMG_8033.jpg

    1443519754-IMG_8038.jpg

    1443519785-IMG_8036.jpg

    1443519836-IMG_7946.jpg

    1443519915-IMG_7953.jpg


    As found:
    1443519980-IMG_7943.jpg

    The pump cap was damaged, so I replaced it with one that fitted, but was not quite the same:
    1443520159-IMG_7950.jpg


    Fettling was reasonably straightforward (except for the solder, which I will link to later.

    A new vapouriser was required:
    1443520346-IMG_8022.jpg

    1443520377-IMG_8024.jpg


    The pump reassembled:
    1443520414-IMG_8025.jpg

    The Tilley reflector came from a Kayen Lamp:
    1443520511-IMG_8043.jpg

    Here it is, lit up and running on my verandah at early dusk:
    1443521065-IMG_8052.jpg

    1443521156-IMG_8055.jpg

    1443521180-IMG_8058.jpg
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 31, 2017
  2. Anthony

    Anthony Australia Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    May 7, 2013
    Messages:
    1,195
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    Nicely done Tony.
    Is that a brass fount or steel and do you think the paint it come in was original?
     
  3. Tony Press

    Tony Press Australia Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2012
    Messages:
    6,826
    Location:
    Stinkpot Bay, Howden, Tasmania, Australia
    The tank is brass (as is the bail); and it was the original paint in the "before" photo (I checked underneath).

    I tried to rematched it as best I could: the colour is almost right - except for the gloss!.

    Cheers

    Tony
     
  4. JEFF JOHNSON

    JEFF JOHNSON United Kingdom Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2010
    Messages:
    10,833
    Location:
    Shetland Islands UK..
    Well fettled! :thumbup:
     
  5. Paul Aslanides

    Paul Aslanides Australia Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2020
    Messages:
    75
    Location:
    Ferntree Gully, Melbourne.
    Tony, some questions, if I may please: * Copper wire is o.k. to hold the glass on the EX100 ? * Copper wire from Jaycar ? * Gauge ? The standard stuff used for winding coils, for example, for crystal sets ? I do have some gal. wire, used for lashing wire mesh fencing to frames and gates.

    * Could you describe the tool used to hold the wires as you twist them together in the drill ?

    In another repair you did, to a Svea stove I think, you threaded brass tube internally 7/16" x 26 tpi. How did you hold the tube whilst tapping, without damaging or crushing the tube ? I have threaded much 1/2" brass tube at a factory in days past, but that was external threading, and the tubes were curved, so quite easy to hold in a fixture without them turning during the tapping process. ( We only tapped the end or straight section of tube for a short distance ). Spouts for kitchen taps etc.

    Thanks for your time and patience.

    Paul.
     
  6. Tony Press

    Tony Press Australia Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2012
    Messages:
    6,826
    Location:
    Stinkpot Bay, Howden, Tasmania, Australia
    Paul

    I’ve used both brass and galvanised wire in the past to make the globe brackets. I’ll check the gauge in the morning. I can’t see why copper won’t work, but the original would have been steel.

    I’ve wound them by hand holding the end in a vise; with pliers, holding the end in a vise; and also with a slow drill. If the wire is not too stiff, using your hands is fine.

    There is a special tool you can buy to twist wire, but there’s really no need.

    To do an internal thread in brass tubing I would, if possible use a piece much longer than needed, internally fit a steel rod that sits snugly inside, then clamp that end between two halves of a piece of wood that has been drilled to the outside diameter of the tube and sawn through the hole. It’s easier to do on a lathe, but I don’t have one.

    Cheers

    Tony

    @Paul Aslanides
     
  7. Anthony

    Anthony Australia Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    May 7, 2013
    Messages:
    1,195
    Location:
    Melbourne, Australia
    The piece of wood Tony is talking about I assume would be like this.
    IMG_4284.JPG
    Best to use a soft wood like pine, poplar or cedar.
    Drill the hole first, cut to length then cut down the centre of the hole.
    The blade thickness is the gap create the grip.
    Have the grain going the same way as the one in the pic so the timber can compress that little bit.
    I like to drill the hole a tiny bit smaller so the shoulders hold the most.
    The thicker the timber the more the load is distributed.
    I mark how they go together so the hole lines up.
    I keep several sizes close to the vise and replace them often.
    Cheap, easy and they work.
    IMG_4285.JPG
     
  8. Paul Aslanides

    Paul Aslanides Australia Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2020
    Messages:
    75
    Location:
    Ferntree Gully, Melbourne.
    Gentlemen - Good ideas. Will implement. Many thanks.
    Best,
    Paul.
     

Share This Page