Tried something new

Discussion in 'Fettling Forum' started by malcolm race, Nov 16, 2020.

  1. malcolm race

    malcolm race United Kingdom Subscriber

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    53B7E725-3573-46EF-A638-936D82EC1596.jpeg For the first time in fettling I’ve tried (new to me) filling a dented fount. It worked ok & sanded down nicely, but practice will hopefully make it even better. The problem I’ve got is the filler hasn’t taken the paint the same as the brass. It has taken properly, no blisters etc, but is a slightly different shade. I’ve used the same Hicote auto paint I always use. 3 coats of primer, 3 of colour & 1 of lacquer. Have missed something. I’m not going to change it but would like to know for next time.
    Cheers
    Malcolm 2665B962-2D34-4C84-BD20-264184767541.jpeg
     
  2. Gary Waller

    Gary Waller Subscriber

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    Did you use a 2 pack car body filler?
    It can shrink slightly especially with large dents you generally have to apply 2 or 3 layers of filler then use a primer. It’s unusual I have not seen a reaction like that.
     
  3. ColinG

    ColinG United Kingdom Subscriber

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    When I filled the dents on my Tilley table lamp it took a few coats of paint before the filler patches finally disappeared. More coats will solve the problem.
     
  4. malcolm race

    malcolm race United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Yes Gary, it was a 2 pack auto filler. It took 2 or 3 coats to get it up to the appropriate level. It also said it was suitable for acrylic or cellulose paint
     
  5. Gary Waller

    Gary Waller Subscriber

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    The rest of the paint work looks spot on so that would lead me to believe it’s a problem with the filler. Daft question but is the filler old or likely to have been exposed to low temperatures? Have you used the filler anywhere else with any issues? I’m wondering if it’s not cured properly.
     
  6. malcolm race

    malcolm race United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Hi Gary, no the filler was brand new for the job. Yes the paint finish is good all over. I’m getting quite good at it these days. As Colin says maybe more coats needed. Or possibly a primer just to seal the filler?
     
  7. ROBBO55

    ROBBO55 Subscriber

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    @malcolm race

    Undercoat then use a can of spray putty over the filled area. Sand it and reapply as required until you can't see the filler mark.
     
  8. AussiePete

    AussiePete Australia Subscriber

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    As @ROBBO55 said. Etching undercoat, then putty coats sanding in between. I would then allow it to cure/dry for say 48 hours before a final undercoat then after drying, the top coats.
    That should take care of that.
    Cheers
    Pete
     
  9. malcolm race

    malcolm race United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Ok great thanks all, I think it’s probably because I didn’t do what has been surgested, particularly Pete’s bit about curing time, I always want to get it done NOW!!
     
  10. Fireexit1

    Fireexit1 United Kingdom Subscriber

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    I have not done this to a lamp - but many a car and motocycle tank. It does look like the filler had not cured fully (this can be time left to cure, age of filler, incorrect mixing or incorrect ratio of hardner to filler), or the paint just didn't like it. Don't let it put you off.
    The "orange peel" effect you have can be a sign of too much thinners in the mix (if a in a can not shaking it up properly or between coats) or putting too much paint on at once. Sometimes spraying at a funny angle can do it. Many thin coats are always better than one. Leave it to dry well between. If you do have orange peel you can use rubbing compound (T-Cut or similar) to reduce it. But once you have laquered on top it is a "feature" . Hope this is helpful
    Chris
     
  11. Rangie

    Rangie Subscriber

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    The filler will absorb paint for a while until the surface is saturated.
    Keep putting a squirt on the patch, letting it cure and rubbing back until you get an even sheen, then rub back and spray the whole fount.

    Alec.
     

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