Turner brass works table lamp

Discussion in 'Turner' started by Tory, Dec 16, 2019.

  1. Tory United States

    Offline
    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2019
    Messages:
    7
    Location:
    Chicago Il
    Happy Monday all!
    This is my first post on the forum. I've been involved in the antique work for about 15 years and have never come across one of these. Unfortunately there is virtually no info on the internet. She was born in Chicago sometime before 1906 when Turner moved from the city proper. Being a life long Chicago boy I felt I owed it the chance to be restored. Thankfully no one destroyed it with an electric refit. I'm foggy on how it can be pressurised as it lacks a pump.

    Let me hear your thoughts.

    Thanks in advance!

    46647.jpeg 46646.jpeg 46645.jpeg 46655.jpg 46647.jpeg 46646.jpeg 46645.jpeg
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 17, 2019
  2. Tony Press

    Tony Press Australia Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2012
    Messages:
    6,499
    Location:
    Stinkpot Bay, Howden, Tasmania, Australia
    @Tory

    Welcome.

    That’s a pretty, and uncommon lamp, and I’m not familiar with it.

    There is some information here about Turner lamps, such as this:

    Turner "Little wonder"

    I’m sure someone will come through with information on it, or similar lamps.

    Cheers

    Tony
     
  3. Jean J

    Jean J Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Jun 25, 2011
    Messages:
    1,797
    Location:
    N E Scotland
    What a find! What a gorgeous lamp! Lucky you Tory.
     
  4. Matty

    Offline
    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2015
    Messages:
    2,375
    Location:
    Queensland, Australia
    Congratulations. As with many Arc lamps of the era, this lamp is quite stunning.

    I was reading a couple of weeks ago where Turner tested these lamps to 110 PSI. That really did take me aback as I just didn't expect a number like that. I certainly wouldn't recommend a pressure anywhere near that being used. I have found 20PSI can be too much.

    These overhead generator lamps, that first commenced mid to late 1890's, were a very good design from the get go. Despite rapid technological advancements, as you would expect from a young industry, this design held its own. The design would be used by many manufacturers of later hollow wire lamps, including Coleman. Coleman continued to sell their version of hollow wire lamps of this design into the 20's.

    This design was very efficient and the lamps produced enormous light. Today, we as collectors struggle to reproduce the true light output that can be attained simply because we lack the ability to find the larger mantles used. Still, even with the smaller mantles readily available, they put out a wonderful light.
     
  5. Konabill

    Offline
    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2015
    Messages:
    28
    Location:
    TEXAS
    D9826571-456D-45E0-B002-F37DB0F8C465.jpeg 1670C985-30BF-45D1-825F-EFA341FD0F4E.jpeg D24F1611-C575-426E-B641-6AC791F5E8FC.jpeg Tory,
    Terry Marsh has one on his site that matches your lamp
    I’ve included a quick picture of mine for reference also........
    It appears we both need a little nickel.
     
  6. JEFF JOHNSON

    JEFF JOHNSON United Kingdom Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2010
    Messages:
    10,341
    Location:
    Shetland Islands UK..
  7. Konabill

    Offline
    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2015
    Messages:
    28
    Location:
    TEXAS
    C9F7DEB1-696C-4190-A6AE-2E744F29B894.jpeg Turner that sold on eBay back in September.....
    These are apparently neither rare or abundant.....just uncommon ??








    5E0EFE2F-F29F-42BD-9296-0727DD962C29.jpeg
     
  8. Tory United States

    Offline
    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2019
    Messages:
    7
    Location:
    Chicago Il
    Wow beautiful! Does yours run at all?
     
  9. Tory United States

    Offline
    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2019
    Messages:
    7
    Location:
    Chicago Il
    I saw this too. Do we have any idea as to what it sold for? I suppose I'm curious about what they are worth.

    Thanks!
     
  10. Tory United States

    Offline
    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2019
    Messages:
    7
    Location:
    Chicago Il
    Thank you very much!
     
  11. Tory United States

    Offline
    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2019
    Messages:
    7
    Location:
    Chicago Il
    Thanks alot for getting back to me so quickly all! Great info. How do you suppose I can pressurise the lamp? It appears to not have a pump onboard like the Coleman's I've restored in the past. Or maybe I'm missing something. And Matty really love how much you know about this little beauty. 150 psi makes sense only because the Chicago mentality seems to be anything worth building is worth overbuilding! Thanks again!
     
  12. BigStevie

    BigStevie United Kingdom Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2018
    Messages:
    1,466
    Location:
    Scottish Highlands
    Hi Tory and welcome from the Scottish Highlands. I know nothing of these charming lamps... looking at the photos it does seem that you’re missing at least the pump knob? The photo that @Konabill put up appears to show a pump knob above the wing nut. I could be totally wrong, I’m sure someone more knowledgeable will make it clear!

    Good luck with getting it fettled, Stevie
     
  13. AussiePete

    AussiePete Australia Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2015
    Messages:
    2,858
    Location:
    Toowoomba Australia
    Welcome from Queensland Australia
    Thank you for sharing, good luck on your fettling this elegant lamp.
    Cheers
    Pete
     
  14. Tory United States

    Offline
    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2019
    Messages:
    7
    Location:
    Chicago Il
    Thanks much for the warm welcome!
    I think that you are correct about the pump on the wing nut. I suppose I'll need to remove it to know for sure. My girlfriend spotted this lamp and is adamant that it be made to run.
     
  15. BigStevie

    BigStevie United Kingdom Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2018
    Messages:
    1,466
    Location:
    Scottish Highlands
    @Tory She’s right, hang on to her!
     
  16. Tory United States

    Offline
    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2019
    Messages:
    7
    Location:
    Chicago Il
    I think you're right!
     
  17. Matty

    Offline
    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2015
    Messages:
    2,375
    Location:
    Queensland, Australia
    @Tory
    From what I could see, Turner first produced the lamp in 1900. However, it wasn't until 1901 that they used the brand name Little Wonder Lamp.

    The air valve does look to be missing from the fuel cap. My suggestion is, take your fuel cap to a bike shop and see if they can fit a Schrader valve to the fuel cap. If they can, problem solved.

    I think it is always a good idea to fettle lamps before first time use. I think because your lamp is the overhead generator type, it is even more reason to change the packing in the both the pricker wheel and the valve gland nut. I can assure you, you don't want to spring a leak and have raw fuel dropping into the lit burner. The existing packing within the gland nuts will more than likely be asbestos rope. You will need to find a modern equivalent. Perhaps a plumbing shop may have something suitable.

    Give the fuel cap washer the once over and replace if necessary.

    It is highly likely that there will be some packing surrounding the pricker rod. This packing, unless previously changed over, will be asbestos too. It will serve you well to remove the pricker from the lamp, and check the condition of both the packing and pricker needle. (I think Americans call the pricker a tip cleaner) While you are at it, you can check to see that the jet (tip) is present and clear of obstructions.

    One thing that your lamp lacks is a pre-heat cup. The generators used on these lamps are quite large and they take a really good pre-heat. You will need to find a suitable pre-heat cup that can clip to the generator so you can add methylated spirits which acts as the fuel source to pre-heat the generator. You may be able to buy a suitable torch or even make one yourself, that can be soaked in methylated spirits, then clipped onto the generator.

    I would give the tank a pressure test too before relying on it to be sound.

    It will be best to check that insects like spiders or wasps haven't made their home inside the tube that transports the gas from the generator to the burner.
     
  18. Matty

    Offline
    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2015
    Messages:
    2,375
    Location:
    Queensland, Australia
    @Tory

    I've had a look at a few of my air valves of similar design. I do think there is a bleed nut missing from your valve. However, you should be able to use the valve as is to pressure test. I am now thinking, the missing bleed valve is to safeguard against check valve failure. So, it isn't the best idea to use the lamp without adding a bleeder/Schrader valve but it is perfectly fine to pressurise the fount and dunk it in water to check for leaks.

    If you have a compressor you can set the compressor at say 20 PSI and pressurise the fount using a suitable nozzle. Personally, I wouldn't go past 40 PSI if I was you even though Turner say they test the founts to 110 PSI. In fact, I wouldn't go past 30 PSI because there is no way you need that sort of pressure and if the tank doesn't fail at 30PSI it won't fail at 15 PSI to 20 PSI which is likely to be your best working pressure. You may find even 10 to 15 PSI is enough.

    Sorry if you find me babbling.
     
  19. Henry Plews

    Henry Plews Subscriber

    Offline
    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2014
    Messages:
    1,326
    Location:
    North Yorkshire
    If not available at your plumbers merchant, search the internet for "graphite string", different thicknesses are available, here is one example:
    1/16" x 3 foot Graphite Packing - 'Graphite String' for steam glands

    Henry.
     
  20. Matty

    Offline
    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2015
    Messages:
    2,375
    Location:
    Queensland, Australia
    @Henry Plews
    Yes, that is a good product. I use essentially the same thing. I bought a thick length of the rope. Because the rope is made up of three strands and wound together, I unwind the rope and use one strand. The single strand is generally a prefect that fits nearly all gland nuts.

    I bought 2 metres that in essence results in 6 metres of rope and that ends up being a lifetime supply for an old geezer like me.

    I think it was a post by yourself Henry, that made me aware of the product. I decided to try it after seeing your post and the rope is one of the best buys I have ever made. So thanks!
     

Share This Page