Unknown German Lantern

Discussion in 'Mystery Lamps' started by Henry Plews, Mar 25, 2018.

  1. Henry Plews

    Henry Plews Subscriber

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    Can anyone tell me who made this lantern please ? It came from Canada via eBay a long time ago. With pinholes in the all steel tank, an open stress crack in the fuel pick-up tube and the broken cleaning needle stuck in the jet, it has sat gathering dust for at least 14 years. So time to do something about it.

    882 01.JPG

    I don’t know who made it, the only identification mark is this label riveted to the collar.

    882 04A.JPG

    There is no lip on the thin (1.25 mm) glass which is same size as for 500 cp Optimus / Petromax type lanterns and is cracked from top to bottom.

    882 14 1.25MM.JPG


    The lantern is 235 mm tall (excluding the handle) and the fount is 150 mm in diameter. Here it is next to an Optimus 200 for comparison.

    882 02.JPG

    The fount.

    882 05.JPG

    Brazed repair to a pin hole in the base-plate. I have also lined the fount with POR15 to stop it from going rusty again.

    882 05A.JPG

    A suitable length of 3mm copper tube was pushed down the original fuel feed and soldered in place. Note brazed repair to another pinhole.

    882 06.JPG

    The burner (on the left) is similar in size and shape to an AGM L38 burner but the screw threads are not compatible.

    882 10.JPG 882 10A.JPG







    882 07.JPG 882 07A.JPG

    882 08.JPG 882 09.JPG

    The cork pip in the Primus type NRV no longer made a good seal and so was replaced with one made of viton.

    882 11.JPG


    Globe cage with lighting door.

    882 12.JPG

    Blue enameled hood.

    882 13.JPG



    A Coleman R55 is the same length as the original generator and the threads on the jamb nut are a perfect match which make it a suitable replacement. [img. 15 & 16]

    882 15.JPG 882 16.JPG

    Time for a test burn. The refurbished R55 behaved well with gasoline (Aspen 4) but I had to use the cleaning needle every minute or so when I tried it with kero. The clean blue flames are a little short but with no mantles to contain them, any more pressure in the fount and they blow themselves out.

    882 17A.JPG

    Coleman 21 mantles, R55 generator and a 50/50 mix of Aspen 4 and kerosene.

    882 18A.JPG

    882 21.JPG 882 22.JPG 882 23.JPG 882 24.JPG

    Quite an easy fettle really, I can't think why it took me so long to get round to do it.

    Henry.
     
  2. ROBBO55

    ROBBO55 Subscriber

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    Thanks Henry for your very detailed post. And congratulations for getting it running so nicely. :clap:
     
  3. JEFF JOHNSON

    JEFF JOHNSON United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Well saved Henry!:thumbup::clap::clap::thumbup:
     
  4. george

    george United States Subscriber

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    Cork pip, eh? I found them on two of my lanterns and both went back to sometime in the 1930's. Could this be a Hasag?:-k
     
  5. Hanzo

    Hanzo Subscriber

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    Always impressed by the knowledge and fettle know how of the members here. Great stuff.
     
  6. Henry Plews

    Henry Plews Subscriber

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    @ROBBO55, @Hanzo & @JEFF JOHNSON Thanks for the compliments.

    @george It's possible but I just don't know. The lantern has been on Terry Marsh's web site for a long time and can be seen towards the bottom of this page Germany lantern manufacturers

    This lantern has also been to Germany when Mackburner and I went to one of the Petromax Treffen (gathering) but at the time, none of the German collectors who were there, could identify it positively, merely speculate.
    Re: the cork pip. I hear what you say but Hasag weren't the only manufacture to use cork, I have a couple of Ditmar lanterns with cork pips and if my memory serves me well, a Prentiss - Wabers ! Or was it a Turner ? Got me thinking now.
    Another Hasag trait was to use a left hand thread to separate the NRV to get at the pip - but not always ! The NRV on this lantern has a right hand thread.

    In spite of the fact that there is a pressure release screw in the filler cap and no positive shut-off valve, the vapouriser is quite slim which suggests, to me at least, that the correct fuel is gasoline. One would have thought that this set-up is not a particularly good idea but I have ex-Swiss army Hasag lanterns which are configured the same and they're meant to run on gasoline.

    I have now fitted a spirit cup and a glass and fashioned a bent wire which I can put through the lighting door and operate the cleaning needle if needed.

    Henry.
     
  7. phaedrus42

    phaedrus42 Subscriber

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    A fascinating mix of German and American design, Henry! The pump plunger is the Petromax design, but as you noted, the burner is related to AGM. The generator looks like a Coleman Q77.
    The burner cage design looks Swedish. I agree that the lamp seems to be designed for gasoline rather than paraffin.
    Cork pips were common on Primus type NRVs for many decades until at least the late 1950s.
     
  8. Martin K.

    Martin K. Subscriber

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    To me this lantern is also a complete mystery.
    It looks a bit like beween all of them: Hasag, Petromax, Standard, but also especially the collar like a Handi Kero-Pet. I agree that the plunger (and filler cap) as well as the lower part of the hood is like Petromax design. But definitely the Petromax 882 is a completely different design, as we saw recently in another post here.
     
  9. george

    george United States Subscriber

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    Henry, The reason I mentioned the cork pip was to possibly help date the lantern. Many lantern companies used that cork-type pip. I had a Primus, two petromax, and an Optimus all used the cork-type pip, and all were made in the 1930's. I am sure there were exceptions but I don't any have examples.;)
     
  10. Henry Plews

    Henry Plews Subscriber

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    @phaedrus42 The generator has the same dimensions as a Coleman Q77 and I had thought about just changing the gas tip but it's too small. I can't remember the Coleman thread size but the gas tip on this is 3/32 Whitworth.

    @george Yes, I had also wondered about the cork signifying early manufacture but then I remembered that the ex-Swiss army Hasags I mentioned above, also have cork pips and they date from the1950's, so I think we can safely say this lantern is somewhere in the region of 60 years old at least. Maybe older but doubtful it's much younger.

    Henry.
     
  11. nep036

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    Beautiful lamp, great proportions and color. In my opinion is from the beginning of the '30, the collar plate with model number is identical to the ones found on petromax lamps of the same period. As well the fiber wheel. Probably not made by petromax, but if someone took inspiration from petromax for the collar plate I am sure they took inspiration from a contemporary lamp, I don't see why they should have copied a style of an older production... the lamp itself is in the style of '30 american lamps... in fact it was made for that part of the world.

    Congratulations, I'd love it.

    Nicola
     
  12. loco7lamp

    loco7lamp Subscriber

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    Hi H

    Great fettle my friend & a great addition to the working part of your collection , looks like a bright'n

    Stu.
     
  13. Henry Plews

    Henry Plews Subscriber

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    Thank you everyone. Yes it is bright and thanks to the 50/50 mix of gas/kero, I haven't had to use the cleaning needle yet.

    Henry.
     
  14. Mackburner

    Mackburner United Kingdom Founder Member Subscriber

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    Some progress on the ID. From a couple of flyers shared with me by Jörg we now know this was made by Erich & Graetz and was on sale in 1929. There is also a table lamp model 883 with the same burner and also in Blue paint finish. They are 200HK (About 180cp) and described as for "Gasolin, Bensin oder Benzol" so designed for gasoline for sure. Neither flyer states they are Petromax brand but both are E&G publications so Petromax maybe but E&G for certain. ::Neil::
     
  15. WimVe

    WimVe Subscriber

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    Pictures of those flyers @Mackburner ?

    Here is a 883 form a 1913 catalogue.
    Courtesy of Hytta.de

    PX-883_1913.jpg
     
    Last edited: Dec 20, 2019
  16. Mackburner

    Mackburner United Kingdom Founder Member Subscriber

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    No not those but they are not mine so I can't show them here as I don't have permision. I will ask. ::Neil::
     

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