Washer material??

Discussion in 'Pressure Lamp Discussion Forum' started by eiremax, Jun 15, 2019.

  1. eiremax

    eiremax Subscriber

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    A 1933 Primus 1020, any idea what material was used to make the fibre washers accompanying the nut holding the frame to the tank??
     
  2. Nils Stephenson

    Nils Stephenson Founder Member

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    These washers are made of the same material as the ones for the top nut on the hood, so I would expect them to be asbestos. I found a company that makes washers and gaskets and got some material (without asbestos) that is quite high temperature resistant and make my own.
     
  3. eiremax

    eiremax Subscriber

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    Best way to disassemble? I might just leave it alone.
     
  4. MYN

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    I don't know exactly what material they used as fibre washers on the Primus but I do know that fibre washers usually get easily torn up once you loosen and tighten the nuts(perhaps a tad bit too much) again.
     
  5. BigStevie

    BigStevie United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Perhaps an exhaust manifold gasket from an older car could be a source of high temperature material for punching out a washer? Just a thought...
     
  6. AussiePete

    AussiePete Australia Subscriber

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    @BigStevie and @eiremax ..... now that’s a good thought ......:-k
    That could just be the stuff to use.
    Cheers
    Pete
     
  7. Graham P

    Graham P Australia Subscriber

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    I would think a red fibre washer would be suitable 100deg C rated (Auto parts stores)
     
  8. Nils Stephenson

    Nils Stephenson Founder Member

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    But if you use the same the material for the top nut washer, it's going to have to handle a lot more than 100°C. More like 300.
     
  9. spiritburner

    spiritburner Admin

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    Anyone got a pic?
     
  10. Anthony

    Anthony Australia Subscriber

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    Would a graphite sheet do the job?
    Or even lead ?
     
  11. MYN

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    Graphite sheet would probably do. So long that its clamped under metal to prevent exposure to hot, oxidative gases that could cause it to burn up.(its carbon afterall).
    Otherwise, graphite could stand well above the temperatures that would melt most metals.
     
  12. Graham P

    Graham P Australia Subscriber

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    My suggestion was for "holding the frame to the tank" as originally asked, if it got much over 100deg C there I think you would have a problem.
     
  13. spiritburner

    spiritburner Admin

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    Frame - I can make fibre washers. I do them for various milspec pumps so have the material. I have red & maybe black. Would need sizes.
     
  14. eiremax

    eiremax Subscriber

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    After a small bit of research, could the material be mica??
     
  15. AussiePete

    AussiePete Australia Subscriber

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    I would have thought mica would not compress enough to seal like a gasket should. In fact I would think it would crush into pieces under pressure of the joint. Just saying........:-k
     
  16. eiremax

    eiremax Subscriber

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    I think the washer by its location was placed there for insulation purposes rather than for sealing. Primus were already using mica for globes so why not for washers.
     
  17. WimVe

    WimVe Subscriber

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    Washers in the old days where: lead, asbestos or rubber.
    Mica is way to brittle.
    When heat transfer is an issue they used asbestos. Best replacement would now be felt, lead or viton.

    On a LILOR lantern I use a disc of lead.
    Works perfect.

    Gaskets for automotive use would also be a good alternative.
     
  18. Nils Stephenson

    Nils Stephenson Founder Member

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    I am sure the original Primus washers are asbestos. They used the same material for the one for the cage as for the top nut, so even if it wasn't necessary to be heat resistant for the cage it was anyway. Today the best option is to use some sort of gasket material of a suitable thickness. I use gasket material called Klingersil.
     
  19. eiremax

    eiremax Subscriber

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    Right. Horrible stuff. That's that lantern for the scrap heap.
     
  20. MYN

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    I'd use asbestos if that's what it is. That tiny bit of stuff won't do much harm unless you break them up and breathe in the dust. The same goes for Thorium mantles.
    Of course, there are plenty of other better options available these days.
     
  21. Mackburner

    Mackburner United Kingdom Founder Member Subscriber

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    Have a look at copper compression washers. Blanchard used these back in the day. I suspect with perhaps an asbestos filler then but you can still get them and they work well for Blanchards. They were not used for heat insulation and much bigger but I think they would work OK and you can get smaller sizes. ::Neil::
     

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