WD-40 Speciallist Rust Removal Soak.

Discussion in 'Fettling Forum' started by MYN, May 30, 2022.

  1. MYN

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    Hi all,
    Does anyone here has any experience or knowledge regarding this?:-
    NL-Rust-Remover-Soak.jpg
    Specifically, I'm seeking information on whether this rust remover is based on the chelation/complexing principle (similar to the well-known Evaporust) or, is this another acid-based product?
    One of the reasons I'm asking is that I'm unable to purchase Evaporust easily in my location.
    I'm looking for something(other than elbow grease and electrolysis) for the safe and easy removal of rust on vitreous enamel-coated steel lantern hoods.
    Thanks for any inputs.
     
  2. podbros

    podbros United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Hi @MYN
    I didn’t know that it was suitable for enamel caps?

    Sorry I can’t answer your question,

    regards, pb
     
  3. MYN

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    Hi @podbros ,
    I have no idea if it is suitable for use on enamelled hoods or not.
    I'm only trying to find out if it belongs to the chelating-type of rust removers or just the regular acidic ones.
    I'm just hoping it is of the former type. If really so, it'd probably be much less likely to haze up a porcelain enamelled surface.
     
  4. Fireexit1

    Fireexit1 United Kingdom Subscriber

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    The other side of the bottle may give a clue ?
    wd40achterkant.jpg
     
  5. MYN

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    Thanks @Fireexit1 .
    It doesn't state anything about chelation but those description and directions seem a little similar to those found on Evaporust's instructions. Sounds somewhat characteristic to those complexing chemicals. The only problem is that the MSDS does not provide any clues in the stated composition to convince me that it contains any chelating chemicals.
    I might purchase a gallon from one of the local on-line stores just to give it a try. Its not too expensive though, not really that cheap here either.
    Its stated having no acids or caustics and non-irritating to skin. It might not be as famous or well-attested as Evapoŕust but I'm not too particular. Only needed it to work sufficiently as long as I can just immerse the entire lantern hood in the stuff and leave it in for an extended period of time without too much concern about it hazing up the enamel in the end.
     
    Last edited: May 31, 2022
  6. Hanzo

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    I've used Evaporust and was very impressed with it, removed rust extremely well and was very gentle on lantern parts. From what I see in this video the WD 40 looks a little different and I wouldn't chance lantern parts in it from what I see in the video.:?:
     
  7. MYN

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    Good video on comparison. No doubts on Evaporust's abilities. The guy said that the parts that came out of WD-40 were still sort of gritty (presumably from unremoved rust, not from etched metal). He was handling all that with bare hands anyway. The parts came out cleaner for Evaporust. I don't know if that means Evaporust is simply stronger or contains a higher concentration of active ingredients.
    However, we still won't get any clues regarding WD-40's effects on porcelain-enamels....Unless someone here had actually tested it on enamels.
    I haven't purchase it yet but likely will, soon.
    When I do, I'd just test by immersing a cheap enamelled steel dish in it for a couple of days and then inspect. My main hope that it won't haze up or discolour the enamel. I'm still ok if it is not as efficient on the rust as Evaporust. I don't mind if WD-40 needs a longer soak to do the same job. Well, that's only because I don't have much of a choice...:lol:: I can't get Evaporust easily in my location.
     
  8. MYN

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    Anyway, I've finally purchased a gallon of the WD-40 Specialist Rust Remover Soak. It arrived weeks ago. Been quite busy of late, so hadn't got the right time to work at it until now.
    I'll start with a very simple test.
    Here are the basic stuffs. An inexpensive(kind of hesitated to use the word 'cheap') vitreous enamel coated steel mug, a plasic(polypropylene) container with a lid and the said WD-40 Rust Remover Soak:
    20220730_183038.jpg
    The primary purpose of this test is not to evaluate its rust removing efficacy but just to find out if the stuff is detrimental on porcelain enamel or not.
    Here's the enameled mug that's been cleaned/degreased and dried before the test:
    20220730_183110.jpg
    Its quite smooth and shiny. I don't know what's the composition the enamel but its certainly isn't acid-resistant(tested and verified with both vinegar and citric acid on another sample a couple of years earlier).
    As for now, I'd just fill the plastic container with some WD-40 Rust Remover Soak and leave the mug inside it, partially submerged in the liquid:
    20220730_183455.jpg
    20220730_183506.jpg
    And then, closed the plastic container with its lid to keep out contaminants:
    20220730_183605.jpg
    I'd leave the mug in its current pòsition for a few days,..starting today.
    I'll report later on the results.
    Thanks for viewing.
     
  9. podbros

    podbros United Kingdom Subscriber

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    I quite like the colour of that mug Myn .. Avocado?
     
  10. MYN

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    Yep, almost so.
     
  11. WimVe

    WimVe Subscriber

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    @MYN , do you also a rust removal test ?
     
  12. MYN

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    Not yet @WimVe
    I think that has been sufficiently documented on the internet and the various youtube videos. Therefore, I'm not too concerned on that at the moment. I'd assume for now that it'd be a little slower than the acids like citric, etc. on rust removal speed.
    I'd be more interested at the moment, to find out if it attacks vitreous enamels or not.
     
  13. MYN

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    So...after slightly over 120 hours (5 full days) of partial immersion, this is it:
    20220804_183654.jpg
    Time to lift it out of the liquid:
    20220804_183817.jpg
    This is what it looks like after water rinsing and drying:-
    20220804_184124.jpg
    20220804_184135.jpg
    20220804_184139.jpg
    Well, its exactly what I've been hoping for, at least till this point.
    Upon inspection, there's basically no visible signs that the WD-40 Rust Remover Soak would attack the porcelain-enamel coating on the steel mug. I guess 5 days should be long enough for anyone to judge on the results. This is tested without addition heating, though. Its done in a tropical environment(here) where ambient temperatures are quite uniform in the range of 27 to 32 deg C throughout the year.
    Therefore, I'll conclude that under the limits imposed on this simple test, the stuff is pretty much safe on most vitreous enamels.
    Next, its likely that I'd test it on a real target:-
    16596115342625478426607785218296.jpg
    That's a badly rusted-through vent/hood of a Coleman 237. That's when we'd see how good it really is on rust removal without affecting the remaining enamel.
     
  14. Tony Press

    Tony Press Australia Subscriber

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    @MYN

    I think you’ve stolen one of my Coleman 237 vents…. Nearly all of the Coleman 500cp lanterns I have are like that.

    One point to be careful about. After you use water-based solution to de-rust or clean the vents, make sure they are thoroughly dry before using them on a running lamp, otherwise you’ll hear the sound of pinging enamel.

    Good luck with your de-rusting.

    Cheers

    Tony
     
  15. Sedgman

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    Thanks @MYN for sharing the results.
     
  16. ROBBO55

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    A good result, MYN :thumbup:
     
  17. MYN

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    Thanks all for viewing.
    Maybe its of those you"ve discarded earlier @Tony Press ?
    A good reminder, Tony. Maybe the enamel might have become more porous over time and repeated use. Probably even some rust under some areas of the enamel by now. Might soak up some water during rinsing. Heating up too quickly might just cause some to flake/ping off the steel by the expanding steam.
     
  18. MYN

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    Ok, since I reckon that there isn't much to lose, the vent is certainly going into the solution:-
    20220806_192809.jpg
    20220806_193012.jpg
    Note that the fresh solution is clear. It doesn't smell much as well. Decided to leave it aside till sometime the next day.
    So after about 22 hours, it looked like this:

    20220807_122701.jpg
    20220807_180822.jpg
    The liquid has turned darker and murkier. There liquid seemed to emit a sulphurous-like smell at this time. The rusty areas appear to be less reddish and somewhat a darker brown/grey. I've decided to give it a little helping hand with a brass brush. Just a gentle brushing at most:
    20220807_182108.jpg
    It looked promising enough. Most of the rust and dark greyish reaction product seemed to be very easily removeable with the brush, leaving behind some relatively clean, nearly-bare steel.
    There's still some rust remaining in the deepest pockets, pits and crevices. The remaining porcelain enamel seemed to be unaffected,..at least visually so.
    So, I'd just put the vent back into the solution to continue the soak. I'll return to check on it again the next day.
    20220807_183800.jpg
     

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  19. WimVe

    WimVe Subscriber

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  20. george

    george United States Subscriber

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  21. ColinG

    ColinG United Kingdom Subscriber

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    In the UK you can buy 30% white vinegar. It's sold as a weed killer (and for other uses) but it works magic on rust . 5Ltrs will cost roughly £20 but it works fast and does an excellent job. I intend to buy some but I'll use it with caution and wear gloves and goggles.
     
  22. MYN

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    I have no doubts that vinegar would work well on rust removal. The problem is that I can't use any of the usual acids here without appreciable harm on the vitreous enamel, @ColinG .
    I've tested the acids on similar samples of the earlier enamelled mug with vinegar, citric acid as well as a product called 'Iron Out' which, comes in powdered form. All these are considered 'weak acids' or perhaps weakly acidic.
    Despite being used in the form of diluted solutions (~5-10% at most), all have been found to cause permanent hazing or dulling on the porcelain enamel surface.
     
  23. MYN

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    So, I was busy with work yesterday and the vent was left in the soak till the third day. All the rust is pretty much, gone and bare steel could clearly be seen at this stage:
    20220809_182808.jpg
    After lifting out for a final brushing, its then thoroughly rinsed with running tap water:
    20220809_183109.jpg
    Followed by a brief immersion in concentrated sodium carbonate solution to remove or perhaps neutralize whatever traces of newly formed, weakly acidic compounds if any.
    20220809_183540.jpg
    Followed by another rinse with deionized water to remove the carbonate:
    20220809_184059.jpg
    Next, to remove all water/moisture as quickly as I can with a methanol/spirit rinse:
    20220809_184258.jpg
    After the methanol rinse, a quick brush and flush with acetone to remove any traces of alcohol and moisture:
    20220809_184552.jpg
    Followed by a thorough rinse with a light naphtha-based product called WD-40 Speciallist Parts and Brake Cleaner. That's to remove all the acetone, (which is still a water-soluble solvent) and to prevent moisture condensation upon cooling due to its rapid evaporation. The naphtha-based brake cleaner is a little less volatile and doesn't cool the steel surface upon evaporation as much as acetone.
    To hasten the process, I used a vacuum cleaner to dry off the last of it:
    20220809_185046.jpg
    Now, to at least temporarily prevent the rust from coming back. I'll just use Fogging Oil for this. All in all, the enamel is completely unharmed and the rust fully removed down to the tiniest pits.
    20220809_185348.jpg
    I then coated the entire vent with Fogging Oil and allowed the excess to drip off:
    20220809_190635.jpg
    I'll leave it aside till I could figure out some ways to permanently protect the steel from rust when hood's put into operation.
    The permanent protection would need to be at least as heat-resistant as the original vitreous enamel coating.
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2022 at 1:07 PM
  24. Fireexit1

    Fireexit1 United Kingdom Subscriber

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    A well presented excercise. I shall use this product on some "not so bad" hoods.
    Thanks Myn
    C
     
  25. Tony Press

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    @MYN

    A few questions.

    Does the rust form a dusty suspension in the liquid? Does this suspension settle out, and is it all fine material?

    After getting the vent to the final stage of soaking, what was the colour of the liquid?

    Thanks in advance.

    Cheers

    Tony
     
  26. ColinG

    ColinG United Kingdom Subscriber

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    One way to protect bare steel is to heat it up and dip it in oil to form a 'blacked' finish. I've done it to the lower part of a Veritas 350 steel hood and it withstands the temperature. How the enamel parts of your hood would stand up to the treatment I don't know.
     
  27. Julian Whittaker

    Julian Whittaker Australia Subscriber

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    OR... I wonder if 'gun blue' would do the trick. Just not sure how it would cope with the heat.
     
  28. MYN

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    @Tony Press
    Yes, it forms a suspension. The liquid turned from clear, colourless to a somewhat dark, coffee coloured one. The solids seem to be very fine, some had already settled out but the liquid is still dark. I'll check on it later to see if it'd remain dark indefinitely or would eventually clear up.
    @ColinG
    Heat-oil quench blackening might be heat-resistant. But the treatment could be a little shocking for enamel. Maybe i might test it on the earlier mug first to find out.
    Thanks @Julian Whittaker
    Maybe I'd test a piece of blued steel under the hood of an operating lantern to find out.
     

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