weeping Tilley vaporiser

Discussion in 'Fettling Forum' started by Paraffinhead, Oct 31, 2018.

  1. Paraffinhead

    Paraffinhead United Kingdom Subscriber

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    There is a weep of paraffin between the brass collar & tube of Porky's vaporiser. Before I do anything that can't be undone - is the brass collar removable? I don't want to end up with a Trigger's Broom of a lamp (lots of new bits but still the same old lamp...) if I can help it.

    Paul.
     
  2. ColinG

    ColinG United Kingdom Subscriber

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    If I've interpreted your question correctly I reckon you'll need a new vaporiser. As far as I'm aware the brass 'collar' at the bottom of the vaporiser tube should be permanently fixed in place. If it's leaking fuel from that joint I doubt you'll be able to successfully repair it.
     
  3. Paraffinhead

    Paraffinhead United Kingdom Subscriber

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    I thought that would be the case. New handle for Trigger's Broom...
    IMG_4865.jpg
     
  4. Graham P

    Graham P Australia Subscriber

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    Some of those early vaporisers had a thread that screwed into the brass knurled bottom, a sealant on that thread may seal it. Its going to get fairly warm, "carefully" applied gasket cement might do. I think it might get too hot for teflon tape but it would do for a test .
     
  5. JEFF JOHNSON

    JEFF JOHNSON United Kingdom Subscriber

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    The Tilley vapouriser tubes which have the brass bottom end are threaded and the brass part screws into them and I have known them to loosen a bit.
     
  6. ColinG

    ColinG United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Well, I've certainly learned something new!
     
  7. JonD

    JonD Subscriber

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    Me too!
    It means I can use them for better things :D/
    Who would have thought it!
     
  8. JEFF JOHNSON

    JEFF JOHNSON United Kingdom Subscriber

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    It's only the older vapourisers with the brass bottom ends which are threaded, the more modern vapourisers with the steel bottom ends are not threaded, the tubes are just pressed to the steel bottom end and sometimes they leak from there.
     
  9. ColinG

    ColinG United Kingdom Subscriber

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    I've also seen a vaporiser with the end swaged over flat that can be used to test the pressurization of a Tilley device. I might make one of those.
     
  10. JonD

    JonD Subscriber

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    Yes - I have both types. A steel/steel one leaks at the join, I was thinking to braze it up or else melt it for scrap.
    The latter is better based on experience so far.
     
  11. JEFF JOHNSON

    JEFF JOHNSON United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Brazing should fix that problem.
     
  12. JonD

    JonD Subscriber

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    Thanks Jeff - I know it would.
    Given what I think of the rest of the construction, in particular at the top end where it matters, I just might save the brazing rod and the gas required.
    Some electro smelter would be greener for the environment.
     
  13. JEFF JOHNSON

    JEFF JOHNSON United Kingdom Subscriber

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    The build quality of the modern Tilley vapourisers is very poor.
     
  14. David Shouksmith

    David Shouksmith United Kingdom Founder Member

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    Yes, out-source production to China, specify low to pay peanuts, have them sent here and then charge top dollar for them. That seems to be Tilley's business model these days. What a way to honour the heritage of a household-name company that's 100 years old in 2019*. They ought to be shot with shit**... :rage:

    *Arguably, perhaps - it depends when you start counting - but I think Tilley produced their first pressure lamps in 1919...

    ** OK, OK - I'll get off the fence now... ;) :lol:
     
  15. JEFF JOHNSON

    JEFF JOHNSON United Kingdom Subscriber

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    I thought that it was 1920 and before that they marketed low pressure gas lights.
     
  16. David Shouksmith

    David Shouksmith United Kingdom Founder Member

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    Yes, Jeff - according to the Tilley website it was 1920. However, according to Wikipedia...

    Tilley lamp - Wikipedia

    ...we should have celebrated their 200th anniversary this year! :doh: ](*,) :lol:
     
  17. Mackburner

    Mackburner United Kingdom Founder Member Subscriber

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    The normal mish mash of truth and myth that is Wiki. The only pressure lamps used in WW1 might have been Coleman after the American's joined the party but certainly not Tilley some years before they were invented. ::Neil::
     
  18. AussiePete

    AussiePete Australia Subscriber

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    Just saying, I have had something similar happen and it turned out that the fount was being slightly pressurised, by ambient heat, forcing kerosene up the generator weeping out of the jet and then running down the generator looking just like that in the picture. The fix ....... loosen the pump/filler cap to relieve any pressure.
    Of course in my case the lamp wasn’t lit, just sittin on the shelf minding its own business having a leak ........
    Cheers
    Peter
     
    Last edited: Nov 5, 2018
  19. Paraffinhead

    Paraffinhead United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Makes a lot of sense - no sign of brazing. I did gave a go at undoing the brass end with no joy, I may have to get some heat on it. Good job I have a collection of blowlamps as well :)

    Paul.
     
  20. JEFF JOHNSON

    JEFF JOHNSON United Kingdom Subscriber

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    The brass ends are usually difficult to unscrew.
     
  21. Paraffinhead

    Paraffinhead United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Et voila! The vaporiser is apart. This is one I practiced on but Porky's came apart just as easily - I just had to make sure I had a good grip on the brass as even with a leather strip the pliers threatened to strip the knurling. I have ordered some exhaust sealant paste to see if I can cure Porky's weep - this only happens under pressure when running so it's not a top-end thermal pressure weep, plus I always leave the pump unscrewed so this should never happen.

    IMG_4884.jpg
     
  22. JonD

    JonD Subscriber

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    @Paraffinhead Congratulations on getting that apart! May I request a slightly different photo when you have time? :)

    Would very much appreciate a shot of the end of the vapouriser tube. I'm curious to see the wall thickness please.

    I would suggest some kind of engine sealant rather than exhaust (usually gritty by experience).
    Something like one of the grades of Hermetite - if it still exists.
     
  23. Paraffinhead

    Paraffinhead United Kingdom Subscriber

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    I would have used Hylomar Blue gasket paste but it may not survive the temperatures involved. Presumably copper grease would also do as it is stable up to 1150 deg C or more.
     
  24. JonD

    JonD Subscriber

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    It is probably not very hot at the bottom end. I was playing with a new Korean vap which had a nice shiny finish and after the first lighting it did this.

    Checking the colour charts for tempering steel the bottom straw band is under 200C and the upper blue one approaching 400C. All that happens in quite a short part of the length...

    DSCN5136.JPG
     
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2018
  25. Paraffinhead

    Paraffinhead United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Here you are - without digging my calipers out I'd guesstimate the wall thickness to be1 - 1.25mm. You can see that even after 3 or 4 cycless of heat/quench there is still a good deal of carbon inside.

    Paul.

    IMG_4893.jpg
     
  26. JonD

    JonD Subscriber

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    @Paraffinhead Many thanks for that. Not very thick is it? Can be seen by the ridge in the brass which is in best focus.
    Interesting. I will compare with the Korean one I am playing with - suspect that is thicker. That is why interested about
    temperature gradient which I hope was of some use. Engine seal good for ~200C will sort you out. Hermetite Red was up to 250C best I know.
    Now called Hylomar apparently and made in Wigan. Sorry don't know about blue as yet.
     
  27. Mackburner

    Mackburner United Kingdom Founder Member Subscriber

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    Use copper slip. It will stand all the heat it is ever lkely to get and give a good seal. I use it on anything to do with generators and it never fails. ::Neil::
     
  28. Paraffinhead

    Paraffinhead United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Thanks Neil - I did think about copper grease. I'll try the Hylomar Blue when I get chance as i already have a tube on the go.
     
  29. Mackburner

    Mackburner United Kingdom Founder Member Subscriber

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    I've not used Hylomar for years since I gave up playing with motors. Worked pretty good on engine gaskets so it will stand the heat at the bottom of a generator for sure and if you have stuff that works you don't need to fix a problem you don't have. ::Neil::
     

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