What is the term American's use for a jet?

Discussion in 'Pressure Lamp Discussion Forum' started by Matty, May 30, 2016.

  1. Matty

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    G'day all,

    This should be short and sweet.

    I can't for the life of me think what the American term is for a vapourisers jet.

    Anyone? I've gone blank and it won't come to me.
     
  2. David Shouksmith

    David Shouksmith United Kingdom Founder Member

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    Nipple?

    I tend to think of the nipple as the little brass object you can hold in your hand whereas the jet is the hole that's drilled in the nipple - thus two different things. But that's my rationale only...
     
  3. Matty

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    Hmm, is it nipple? Seriously, I'm stuck.

    I can remember reading a post by an American and he mentioned something about a nipple. I looked at his photos and I couldn't see anything I'd call a nipple.

    You won't believe this but I can't now recall what he was referring to as a nipple even though I asked him and he answered!
     
  4. Tony Press

    Tony Press Australia Subscriber

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    The U.S. use the term jet for both the nipple and the jet, whereas we would use jet for the hole and nipple for the bit the hole is in.

    Generator = vaporizer (US spelling)

    Globe = chimney

    Hood = Vent

    Tank = Fount etc.

    Countries separated by a common language...

    Cheers

    Tony
     
  5. Tony Press

    Tony Press Australia Subscriber

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    Crossed with Shouksmith

    Matty

    Nipple is used to describe the bit at the end of the Coleman pump...

    Tony
     
  6. David Shouksmith

    David Shouksmith United Kingdom Founder Member

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    Hey, Press - watch who you're calling Shouksmith. ;) :lol:

    Anyway,
    [-X =; Don't start me - I'm sitting on my hands here with my tongue firmly between my teeth... :lol:
     
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  7. Matty

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    Thanks to both of you.

    I'm writing an article and I have someone to blame, as well as myself.....
     
  8. Matty

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    Actually, it's so bloody interesting, I'll post it here.

    Manufacturing A Nipple/Jet Proves Troublesome

    1906, Doran tells of how manufacturing a jet in 1894ish era would prove to be.

    Firstly, he mentions the quality of fuel and how it had progressed from 1894 to 1906. Doran says that fuel in it's original commercial form had a lot of paraffin (kerosene – I'm assuming) and that caused the burner to clog up. By 1906, Doran says that fuel had improved greatly where it was much easier now for gas lamps to operate.

    When producing the first jets, it seems obvious that drill bits need for the required “9-1000 of an inch in diameter” weren't available.

    Drilling through 3/8” metal at “9-1000s of an inch” was very problematic.

    The solution was found with using piano wire, a microscope and a worker with a deft touch to feed the piano wire.
     
  9. JEFF JOHNSON

    JEFF JOHNSON United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Hello Matty, many Americans use the term gas tip for a jet.
     
  10. Digout

    Digout Australia Subscriber

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    Paraffin (in this context) could refer to the Paraffin Wax content of the fuel.
     
  11. Matty

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    Jeff,

    My main man. Yep, that's the term I was thinking of. Actually, that's the term I couldn't think of.

    Thanks.
     
  12. Matty

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    Mate, yes, I wasn't sure it was paraffin as we use the term today.

    That's why I put the "I assume" and didn't make a statement that it was kerosene.
     
  13. Anthony

    Anthony Australia Subscriber

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    Digout, thanks for adding that.
    I guess that would be paraffin wax as a residue from refining rather than a kerosene added to the fuel.

    I was watching a documentary which mentioned that in the start of the century gasoline was not standardised and changed from one refiner to the next.
    Can't remember if it was Henry Ford who addressed that or J D Rockefeller.
    Would have made things hard for any lamp developer.
     
  14. David Shouksmith

    David Shouksmith United Kingdom Founder Member

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    Quite likely but in simple terms, the paraffins are a homologous series of a large number of straight-chain, single-bonded organic compounds whose structural formula is C2H(2n+2), ranging from the gas methane (CH4), ranging through liquids such as heptane (C7H16) and becoming increasingly waxy in nature as the carbon chain lengthens until they become solid at some point around C20H42 at a guess.

    The name paraffin is a contraction of 'par affinity' which is a reflection of the relative lack of reactivity compared with other organic compounds which contain double and triple bonds. These bonds are less stable than single bonds so the compounds containing them are correspondingly more reactive.

    Just sayin'... :)
     
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  15. Matty

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    David,

    If you have ever heard of the expression "baffled by science" you will understand what just happened to me when reading your post.

    There was nothing wrong with your post. I'm sure, like I indicated, I was simply baffled by science.
     
  16. Matty

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    With an answer like that you look to be the go to man for this question.

    Whilst talking about the improvements in fuel, in the same article Doran mentioned you needed 88% air.

    I've only ever seen 94 to 96% air ever mentioned apart from this 88%.

    Is it, that when the fuel was of poorer quality it needed less air to ignite? Perhaps because of impurities?
     
  17. Derek

    Derek Subscriber

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    A Gas tip? Is that something you give the gas man after he's been to call? Would never have thought it. I'm certainly not going to refer to those in carburetors as 'gas tips', they're jets. As for the hole in the jet, it's a drilling. Though some items have nozzles, such as hosepipes.

    Some may argue that the jet is the medium that is expelled from the gas tip/nozzle/nipple/drilling/big hole at the back end of an aeroplane (or the plane itself).

    Funny old world.
     
  18. Claus C

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    Translated from Danish - we call it injection-nozzle or fuel-nozzle. Pretty apt I think.
    I have heard fuelvalve, jet and even vapourizer being used, but thats all "wrong" to me, while the nozzle not really is a valve, but a nozzle with a cleaningneedle. Nor is it a jet, while the shape of the fuel coming out of the nozzle has no influence, but the amount. And the job for the nozzle is not vapourizing.
    Sometimes these differences in speaking creates misunderstandings here but we all have different backgrounds and if a "wrong" word is used often enough it turns valid over time. No problem to me.

    Claus C
     
  19. Tony Press

    Tony Press Australia Subscriber

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    Back to nipple and jet.

    Traditional terminology, in UK and Australian English, for the screw-in brass-thingy that has a small hole in it from whence the vapourised fuel is emitted is "nipple".

    Here, from Primus:

    http://classicpressurelamps.com/index.php?threads/2107

    And here from Aladdin Australia:

    1465796748-Aladin_Partys_Diagram.JPG

    I always thought that the "jet" was the hole, not its surrounds.

    Cheers

    Tony
     

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  20. Derek

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    The Flit Gun description uses both nozzle and jet for the same item . . .

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flit_gun

    "My mother had a Flit Gun,
    it was not devoid of charm.
    A bit of Flit shot out of it -
    the rest shot up her arm"

    Pam Ayres.
     
  21. expat

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    Yep, jet is the hole through which the jet of vapour/liquid emerges.
     
  22. Carlsson

    Carlsson Sweden Admin/Founder Member

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    Isn't that the orifice?
    If we should split hair, a jet is the actual gas stream, isn't it?

    To me it's still the entire brass screw that is the jet.
    I guess I have it from working on carburettors. There it's always the entire, changeable piece, orifice and all, that's a jet.
    A nipple is a totally different thing to me, so I'll stick to call it a jet.

    As Jeff already mentioned, gas tip is used in North-America. Atleast I notice that they call it 'gas tip' in most catalogues.
    But I think it's still more common that people use the word jet in discussions here and at e.g. the Coleman forum, and it's the term people actually use that is the important thing.
     
  23. expat

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    Christer, correctly speaking, it would be a "jet of liquid" or a "jet of vapour" - the jet is the orifice it emerges from.

    Of course, usage will vary dependent on country or one's background!
     
  24. Claus C

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    As I remember from elementary school, then a jet is the way a hole through the surrounding material is specially shaped to create a certain shaped jetstream/force, and the orifice is the end of the hole, the eye :lol: this is getting nerdy :lol:

    Claus C
     
  25. expat

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    :lol: nerdy is good :thumbup:
     
  26. podbros

    podbros United Kingdom Subscriber

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    ....Steady on there.......Laying it on a bit thick aren't we?

    .... :( ....nerdy is all i've got... :cry:
     
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  27. expat

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    @Pod Bros - nerdy is nothing to be ashamed of! I play D&D and have been a DM for almost a year now!
     
  28. David Shouksmith

    David Shouksmith United Kingdom Founder Member

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    Darts and dominoes? Ducks and drakes?

    Drum majorette? Doc Martin?

    That's the thing about abbreviations... ](*,)
     
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  29. longilily

    longilily United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Dungeons and Dragons :-k

    And

    Dungeon Master :-k
     
  30. David Shouksmith

    David Shouksmith United Kingdom Founder Member

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    Yeah, with a little thought I got there as well, Ray, but I still haven't a clue what being a DM involves - sure sounds interesting, though... ;) :lol:
     

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