You know it's going to be bad when

Discussion in 'Fettling Forum' started by Reese Williams, Aug 22, 2021.

  1. Reese Williams

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    you dump this out of the fount. PXL_20210821_230152274.jpg

    Then you find this.
    PXL_20210821_230245307.jpg
    But when it's in this you just want to cry.
    PXL_20210821_230257715.jpg
     
  2. Tony Press

    Tony Press Australia Subscriber

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    Ouch!

    Tony
     
  3. JEFF JOHNSON

    JEFF JOHNSON United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Some welding required.
     
  4. Reese Williams

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    @JEFF JOHNSON Problem is with the amount of rust that came out of it and the size of those holes it means there are others just waiting to come through. The only way I would feel comfortable welding this fount is to split the tank at the seam where the two halves are joined and welding a donut shaped plate into the entire bottom. Sadly while I can braze and solder just well enough to get some jobs done, I'm not a welder, so that job is beyond my skill set. I am, however, considering trying to find some sort of prefabricated tubing that has 90 degree elbows and fabricate a tank from those. I'm open to ideas.
     
  5. Randy Field

    Randy Field United States Subscriber

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    Look at this thread for the Windhorst Inverted, or ‘hanging lamp’. Its actually made from curved tubing. Maybe it will give you some ideas. It seems I’ve seen someone fabricate a tank from a series of 45 degree fittings.
    Windhorst Hanging Lamp
     
  6. presscall

    presscall United Kingdom Subscriber

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    @Reese Williams That’s tough, Reese. I wholehearedly agree with your assessment that patching wouldn’t be the way to go. Damn!

    John
     
  7. Reese Williams

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    @Randy Field Thanks for that link. That's exactly the kind of thing I have in mind. Now to fins a suitable source of tubing.
     
  8. ColinG

    ColinG United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Damn, that's pretty disheartening! I bought a 214 /530 stove combo that looked ok on the listing but to when it arrived... oh dear lord! The stove only needed genny but the 214 tank was more rust that steel. I tried to weld the tank but it was so thin in places the electrode blew yet more holes! I saved some parts but sourced a new tank as the only solution.... not an option for you of course. I'm sure you'll figure out a solution but it's probably going to take a while. Good luck fella!
     
  9. JEFF JOHNSON

    JEFF JOHNSON United Kingdom Subscriber

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    That's a pity, but parts lamps are useful.
     
  10. podbros

    podbros United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Sorry to see that.. but it will be repairable, even if you feel it’s beyond your skills there will be someone who can help?
    I just looked on eBay and there seem to be exhaust sections e.g 3” o/d x 90 degree in stainless and that was just a quick search..

    Another though was the fuel tanks used for LPG conversions? But all the ones I’ve seen are quite big?
     
    Last edited: Aug 22, 2021
  11. Thomas

    Thomas Subscriber

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    Why not solder the holes an then epoxy coat the tank?
     
  12. ColinG

    ColinG United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Brazing (as opposed to silbrazing) might be a possibility as it's on steel. It'll be stronger than solder and you can build it up.
     
  13. Reese Williams

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    @Thomas The amount of rust that came out of the fount and the size of the holes are clear warning signs that there are more holes just waiting to come through. When a fount is rusted enough on the inside that holes appear it means the rest of the bottom is also badly rusted and not safe to use. I base those statements on 40ish years of lantern/stove collecting and having cut open a number of pinholed founts to examine the insides. I am firmly against using any sealers on a rust compromised fount, I think it is a false sense of security and a danger, if not to the one who does the sealing, to someone down the line who acquires the device without knowing its history. There are those who will say "I've sealed plenty of pinholed lanterns and never had a problem yet." The yet in that statement is the problem.

    The only way I believe this fount could be salvaged is to cut it apart at the join of the two halves, clean and solder a sheet of brass around the entire bottom from the inside then rejoin the halves. If the fount was soft soldered together I might give that a try, but I think it is welded and so the effort starts to exceed the value. Perhaps when I get the other 80 or so lanterns in the queue fettled I might still give it a try.
     
  14. ColinG

    ColinG United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Good grief, it sounds extremely badly corroded! I had a 214 in that state and there were more holes than steel. TBH you could almost get a steel fabricator to make one for you easier than trying to fix it!
     
  15. Reese Williams

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    I'm really torn between cutting it apart at the seam or trying to fabricate a new tank. Part of the problem is a somewhat OCD inclination to not have any non-working item in the collection. That often sends me down the rabbit hole of sending way more time on a project than is justified. I know that with a conventional fount in this shape cutting out the baseplate and welding in a replacement is a viable fix. The other side of my brain is whispering "Build a new fount from scratch." I've been brainstorming various designs since forming the metal to duplicate the original is probably beyond both the available tools and my metalsmithing abilities.
     
  16. podbros

    podbros United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Hi Reese,
    I get what you say about the non-working/just sitting there thing..

    Also the profile of the tank is quite distinctive ?

    One of the potential problems with cutting out the bottom in one piece, or even large parts of it is that the sides will move.. your way of separating the two halves would prevent that but just trying to separate them is not easy either??
    Do you think the seams are copper brazed?
     
  17. ColinG

    ColinG United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Totally understand not wanting to leave it non-working. For a while I gave up on my Prabhat because it was so badly made and very hard to repair. Couldn't stand it sitting there not working so in the end I bit the bullet and finally got it working.
     
  18. WimVe

    WimVe Subscriber

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    Well the border betwee putting a lamp on a shelf and restoring it safely is a thin one.
    Cutting this tank shape and repairing it will also alther the shape (I guess) and will it al in al be safe in the end ?

    You also can put the lamp aside and wait and try to find a donor tank.
     
  19. Thomas

    Thomas Subscriber

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    Just a thought you may be able to find a metal air cleaner housing that would make a good tank repair section. Check a local tractor parts store or industrial supply company. Screenshot_20210918-215049_Chrome.jpg
     

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