Cellar find: an old and neglected Tilley

Discussion in 'Fettling Forum' started by Westfield, Nov 7, 2020.

  1. Westfield

    Westfield United Kingdom Subscriber

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    That looks great rayw. I'm hoping to strike a nice balance between original patina and beautifully restored, so at this point I don't plan to go down that road. But things may change. The hood is a problem as it is quite badly damaged, and the consensus on here seems to be that there's not much you can do about it.
     
  2. podbros

    podbros United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Ok, you mentioned Turtle wax a while ago.. why not give that a try?

    If you need to get or order something then better to wait a few days (or maybe Amazon next day delivery?) rather than use something that might not be suitable for your fount?

    As you said, others on here will know.. I've never soaked a tank/fount in citric acid before myself so can't say what would happen..

    I advise caution.. 'Safety First' :)
     
  3. rayw

    rayw United Kingdom Subscriber

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    I know what you mean, my decieder was a dent in the side which i wanted to cover up so i filled it with car body filler and then painted it, the hood was well and truly shot so i found a better one on e bay and saved the original as a souveni.
    The frame is not finished yet i indend to improve that.
     
  4. Westfield

    Westfield United Kingdom Subscriber

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    This is the problem when you've got the tank and the hood looking so good - the other bits need to match!
     
  5. Westfield

    Westfield United Kingdom Subscriber

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    After getting sidetracked by real life, and other piffling issues, I started work on the hood. It's in such poor condition that this is about damage control more than anything else. I considered vinegar or citric acid, but decided to go with a litre of Evaporust. In the end a litre was only just enough, even when using a small container into which the hood fitted neatly. I will definitely go with a 5L can next time. I put the hood in at 10:30 in the morning, and left it for 12 hours.

    Here are some "before" images.

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    Here's what it looked like "after" the Evaporust treatment. I'm quite pleased. It has not achieved miracles, but I wasn't expecting any. Overall it looks a lot cleaner. One day, if I see a brown hood in super condition, I may snaffle one for this, but as this lamp has personal significance for me (warts and all) I don't want to make indiscriminate wholesale changes.

    20201126_082455-50%.jpg

    20201126_082512-50%.jpg 20201126_082506-50%.jpg 20201126_082503-50%.jpg

    20201126_082517-50%.jpg
     
  6. Rangie

    Rangie Subscriber

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    Nice! I'd give that a go on a wire buff to even out the pitting and then a spray of high-temperature clear lacquer, that will help stop the corrosion reappearing after burning.

    Alec.
     
  7. Westfield

    Westfield United Kingdom Subscriber

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    Such... such things exist? :-k
     
  8. MikeO

    MikeO Subscriber

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    It does exist, but it won't do well at the temps the vent reaches in my experience. Yellows and gets a burnt look. It does well on an engine block at the temperatures those hit.

    Mike.
     
  9. Fireexit1

    Fireexit1 United Kingdom Subscriber

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    You could treat the remaining rust with rust converter. Phosphoric acid - it used to be called Jenolite in the UK. This turns it black and sort of rust-resistant. Wash off excess with meths before it dries.
     
  10. MYN

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    You did right by using Evaporust rather than any acids. Acids tend to haze up vitreous enamels.
    Is the fount coated with brass/gold paint or is it bare brass? If its painted, and you want to preserve it, don't soak it in citric acid or vinegar. If its bare brass, no problems with citric/vinegar. Just not too long.
    You can soak the steel cage/frame in citric acid. You can dilute it a bit according to your preference. I've soaked rusty steel parts in very concentrated citric acid before. It does no harm even after a couple of days. It'll completely remove the heaviest rusts down to the tiniest crevices(but that's after 48hrs).
    When was the last time you've seen it in operation? In the 70s as a kid?
     
  11. Kiwi

    Kiwi Subscriber

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    I would call that vent an absolute success, run it as it is. Maybe carefully condition the bare spots with some oil as you would a cast iron pan.
     

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